Stretching your plywood...just 1 technique

Anything to do with mechanical, construction etc

Stretching your plywood...just 1 technique

Postby doug hodder » Thu Dec 31, 2009 11:54 pm

Recently there have been a number of people asking where to get larger sheets of ply. They can be difficult and almost always are very expensive to get. I know that the experienced woodworkers here know this technique, but I thought it would be a handy thing for some of the newer builders to see. If someone would like to document scarfing ply, that would be great. There are several ways to stretch your plywood, here's one method.

This technique uses a router and if you don't have a router....well, you're going to need one anyway as it's a real versatile tool. Pick up a 3 wing cutter. Shown is an 1/8" one but they are also available in 1/4". It will cut a 1/2" slot into the edge of the ply. The 1/4" one will cut a 9/16 wide slot.

Adjust the cutter so that it is approximately cutting in the middle of the ply. I mark the side that I rout from so if it's not dead on, the sides will mate up fine anyway. Rout all the slots for the matching pieces.

I cut splines out of baltic birch ply. It's a true 1/8" ply so it's a dead on match to fit the slots. I rip them just a hair under 1", if there is any crud in the slot or they are too wide, the ply will want to sort of kink at the joint. A little narrower takes care of any of that. Baltic birch is also stronger than a lot of the cheap plys available when using small pieces.

Glue it all up, make sure to butter the sides of the spline really well and the edges on the ply sides. Weight and clamp, watch too much end pressure with a clamp however. I use epoxy as it gives me more working time, however Titebond works well also.

It's a real easy/quick way to make up whatever size sheets you want. For a woodie...I use a lesser substrate, then laminate up the nice thin veneer ply over it, making sure that the joints don't fall on top of each other. I've done this on 5 trailers so far and it works great for me. I made some 6'4" x 11' ply this evening. Doug


Image

Image

Image
Last edited by doug hodder on Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:14 am, edited 3 times in total.
doug hodder
*Snoop Dougie Doug
 
Posts: 12624
Images: 562
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 11:20 pm

Postby Juneaudave » Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:01 am

:thumbsup: Thanks for the tip Doug!!! So...how big is that sheet you glued up for the Nomad side? I couldn't find that much floor space!!
User avatar
Juneaudave
Super Duper Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 3188
Images: 372
Joined: Sun Jul 03, 2005 12:11 pm
Location: Juneau, Alaska

Postby len19070 » Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:21 am

This really is a great technique.

Image
Image
Image

You can make some BIG sheets of plywood this way.

Happy Trails

Len
Last edited by len19070 on Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
:peace: :peace: :peace: :peace: :peace:
http://s26.photobucket.com/user/len1907 ... 20trailers

"If you do good things, good things will happen to you"..... Earl Hickey
User avatar
len19070
3000 Club
3000 Club
 
Posts: 3054
Images: 24
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2004 7:44 pm
Location: S.E Pa. Morton
Top

Postby High Desert » Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:29 am

question guys- what's the minimum thickness ply you can do this technique on?

Great idea, thanks for sharing it! :thumbsup:
Shaun

"it's not the years honey, it's the mileage"
High Desert
Platinum Donating Member
 
Posts: 8780
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 1:46 pm
Location: SW Washington state
Top

Postby doug hodder » Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:36 am

It kinda depends on how comfortable/precise you are with your routing. I'd bet that with good quality ply, a steady hand and patience, you could spline full 1/4". That would allow 1/16 on each side of the spline. 3/8" is no problem. Doug
doug hodder
*Snoop Dougie Doug
 
Posts: 12624
Images: 562
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 11:20 pm
Top

Postby len19070 » Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:41 am

High Desert wrote:question guys- what's the minimum thickness ply you can do this technique on? :thumbsup:


The thinnest I've ever done it with is 1/2".

I made some shelving out of 3/4" plywood scraps once using 2 splines in it...it worked, but it was overkill.

Happy Trails

Len
:peace: :peace: :peace: :peace: :peace:
http://s26.photobucket.com/user/len1907 ... 20trailers

"If you do good things, good things will happen to you"..... Earl Hickey
User avatar
len19070
3000 Club
3000 Club
 
Posts: 3054
Images: 24
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2004 7:44 pm
Location: S.E Pa. Morton
Top

Postby High Desert » Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:42 am

Thanks Doug and Len. I was thinking about the 3/8 to 1/2 range. This really changes the way a person looks at materials when deciding on build size.
Shaun

"it's not the years honey, it's the mileage"
High Desert
Platinum Donating Member
 
Posts: 8780
Images: 27
Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 1:46 pm
Location: SW Washington state
Top

Postby doug hodder » Fri Jan 01, 2010 12:47 am

Another advantage is that if you have a load of smaller pieces the same thickness, you don't need to go buy a new sheet of material. If it's going to be skinned in aluminum it's all hidden anyway. Doug
doug hodder
*Snoop Dougie Doug
 
Posts: 12624
Images: 562
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 11:20 pm
Top

Postby prohandyman » Fri Jan 01, 2010 7:55 am

Great thread. This should help alot of builders. :thumbsup:
Dan
144119103454121995
User avatar
prohandyman
Super Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 1838
Images: 722
Joined: Fri Dec 22, 2006 3:21 pm
Location: Greenwood, IN
Top

Postby madjack » Fri Jan 01, 2010 10:56 am

I use the same technique as Doug...sure beats paying 100+bux for a single sheet of ply...I have also used a biscuit joiner, which worked just fine but prefer the continuous run a spline gives you.........
madjack 8)

p.s. I have used a Titebond type glue for this BUT MUCH PREFER EPOXY for this...especially somewhat thickened epoxy...........mj
A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any invention in human history - with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila.
most all personal problems can be solved with the proper application of high explosives
User avatar
madjack
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15103
Images: 177
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 5:27 pm
Location: Central Louisiana
Top

Postby rwelp » Fri Jan 01, 2010 11:03 am

For a quick and simple method to make scarf joints, try this link: http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/stitchglue/plyshophtm/scarfjig2.htm You can also use a half lap joint. :thumbsup:
Rob Welp
Last edited by rwelp on Sat Jan 02, 2010 7:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
Rob Welp
Build Pics

Image
User avatar
rwelp
Teardrop Advisor
 
Posts: 79
Images: 66
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 10:02 pm
Location: St Peters, Mo
Top

Postby artwebb » Sat Jan 02, 2010 12:07 am

rwelp wrote:For a quick and simple method to make scarf joints, try this link: http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/stitchglue/plyshophtm/scarfjig2.htm. You can also use a half lap joint. :thumbsup:
Rob Welp

Page Not Found. Possibly removed or under construction
I'm not old, I'm Vintage!
artwebb
The 300 Club
 
Posts: 320
Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2009 12:01 am
Location: Columbus, Texas
Top

Postby rwelp » Sat Jan 02, 2010 8:07 am

artwebb wrote:

Page Not Found. Possibly removed or under construction


Sorry abouy that, when I copied the url I accidently put an extra period in there. Try this one:http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/stitchglue/plyshophtm/scarfjig2.htm

Rob Welp :oops: ;)
Rob Welp
Build Pics

Image
User avatar
rwelp
Teardrop Advisor
 
Posts: 79
Images: 66
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 10:02 pm
Location: St Peters, Mo
Top

Postby KDOG » Sat Jan 02, 2010 11:20 am

EXCELLENT. I don't know how I didn't think of this! I've been trying to desperately think of where to get "oversized" ply, but with this technique I don't need to! I can get started sooner. You, sir, deserve a big :thumbsup:
FAILURE TO PLAN ON YOUR PART DOES NOT CONSTITUTE AN EMERGENCY ON MY PART.
User avatar
KDOG
Teardrop Master
 
Posts: 217
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 2:31 pm
Location: Cape May Court House, NJ
Top

Postby CaliforniaKid » Tue Jan 05, 2010 6:59 am

wow another great thread...this was something i was wondering about to :thumbsup:
CaliforniaKid
Teardrop Inspector
 
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:40 am
Location: redding California
Top

Next

Return to Teardrop Construction Tips & Techniques

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: aggie79 and 2 guests