Seans bicycle "bed roll"

Teardrop shaped bicycle travel trailers & related information

Seans bicycle "bed roll"

Postby Miriam C. » Wed Oct 04, 2006 5:15 pm

This is Sean's bicycle "bed roll" profile and the veneer he has choosen to make if of. He spent the afternoon separating a door to get these pieces, then cleaning the glue off. :phew:

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:peace: Thanks for the help. Sean
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Postby madjack » Wed Oct 04, 2006 8:55 pm

Auntie M...looks like Sean has got the fever...the pics you requested are in the "other" BedRoll thread..... 8)
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Postby Greg M » Wed Oct 04, 2006 10:55 pm

Sean,

I fooled around a bit with the bedroll idea. If you turn it around and make it an overlapping hardshell you could get better weather protection and added privacy. Here's a sketch:
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I was thinking that the tailgate could be a removable panel so you don't have to climb over it. and then the end could be a fabric panel that velcros in to let you get in and out easy. Maybe add a zipper and some mosquito netting even.

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Postby madjack » Thu Oct 05, 2006 1:12 am

...that is a pretty good idea Greg...we have toying with the idea of hard sides that fold over the bed and lift into place when the top is raised(supporting it) with either a fold down panel for the front or a cloth front panel...while this one is built of 1/2" ply fastened to a hollow core door for the floor, the plan is to build future versions outta Alumalite, which is corroplast with a .015 AL skin bonded to both sides...very light and rigid.......
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Postby AmyH » Thu Oct 05, 2006 10:55 am

Nice figure on that wood! It should make for a really nice bedroll! :thumbsup: Let Sean know we are all looking forward to more pics of the project as it progresses. ;)
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Postby Miriam C. » Thu Oct 05, 2006 2:48 pm

Gregg good idea. I didn't open up in time to get rid of the curve. Sean has a 14 inch radius on the front. He made it bigger than original. It is now 27" tall in front and 20 in the rear. That way if it rains real hard from the sides he can lower it. (living in SW Kansas will teach you that.) He figures on clamping it together and getting an idea of the weight. If the weight is too high he will chop it.

He has an old tent he got for free to get material and windows from.
Here is his cut out sides.
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MJ- looked up Econolite (similar to Alumalite) but .016 not .040. might be good for bikes. Asked for a price for each. 8) Thanks

Thanks Amy. He is excited that people got in to give him answers so fast. Already has an idea for a second when he gets his driving licence. I have created a monster. Not sure him mom is please with me. :lol: 8)
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Postby angib » Thu Oct 05, 2006 4:24 pm

Greg's hardside idea shows up the problem that I had to work around with my full-length-roof version of the Winter Warrior - you have to pay attention to the arcs around the hinge to get the lengths right.

The top diagram shows what happens to Greg's design when lowered - the bottom half of the (red/blue) lid tries to drive itself through the (green) base. The bottom diagram shows how much it needs to overhang the base if it's going to be hinged down.

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And what's with this aluminum-faced coroplast? If you have to pedal it around, the aluminum is going to be a lot of added weight. What's wrong with straight coroplast? The lower bodywork on my motorbike was coroplast and duct tape for a long time and it did fine in heavy rain at 90mph.

So for example, the trailer top in corroplast might need a 1" deep coroplast rib running across it every 12-16", held in place with duct tape, to stop it deflecting. That's a little over a square foot of extra coroplast or 1/3 of a pound (plus that duct tape!). Two 0.040 skins of aluminum weight 1.1 pounds/sqft or about 18 pounds for the whole top - even the 0.016 skins weigh 7 pounds for just the top.

But then again, youth will generally overcome adversity, so a heavy trailer in the hand is better than an unfinished light trailer!

Andrew
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Postby madjack » Thu Oct 05, 2006 4:24 pm

Sean, I like the larger look...I tried to get Jim to go bigger when he was doing the design work but he wanted to keep as low a profile as he could get to minimize wind resistance when towing at hiway speeds...not a problem behind a bicycle....

Auntie M....isn't that what grandparents are supposed to do...wind 'em up and send 'em home for.....revenge :o :lol:
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Postby D.J. » Thu Oct 05, 2006 6:39 pm

This is the most stable side mount that I have seen . Mine is a little springy . I hope that this helps .

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Postby Miriam C. » Thu Oct 05, 2006 7:14 pm

Hey thanks DJ. But do you have a close up of how it is hooked on there. What is the tubing made of. I have a friend who welds and might help me.

Hey what do you use that for? It is neat.

Thanks Mad Jack and Andrew. The help with the measurement is great. Now I can look really smart with my friends. 8)
-sean

Thats my boy! Thanks guys and girls. MJ --- my kids think I overdo getting the kids into new hobbies and project. :lol: :( I'm a good granny.) :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby madjack » Thu Oct 05, 2006 8:55 pm

Auntie M, hobbies and projects are MUCH better than drugs and gangs......................................... 8)
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Postby D.J. » Fri Oct 06, 2006 8:51 am

I don't have any more info on that trailer . I ran across it while surfing the net recently . I checked my history but could not find the site again .......D.J.
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Postby wok » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:36 pm

For the attachtment to the bicycle, you will want to make a clamp that tightens itself onto the chainstay and seatstay of the bicycle. The seatstays are the metal tubes coming down from below the seat, and ending at the rear axle on either side. The chain stays are the metal tubes that connect from the Bottom Bracket, which is where the cranks go through (cranks are what the pedals attach to) and then go back and end at the rear axle with the seat stays. You would of course connect it on the non-drive side, so as not to interfere with the chain or gears. A huge wing-nut of some sort is how the manufactuerd trailers usually do it, so the clamp can be quickly removed from the bike. As far as a pivot, they normally just use a section of stiff spring, that will allow turning, but still support the trailer. This is how the 200-400 dollar Trek kiddie trailers are designed, as well as Burly and a few others. Burly has quite a few trailers you might want to check out for designs... http://www.burly.com. Other than that, you can use cheap lightweight wheels, since it wont be holding too much or going to fast. Get double walled rims at a minimum. PM me and I can source some for you cheap. Also, quick reales wheels would be nice as they can be removed in seconds allowing for storage, a more permanent camp setup, or that rainy day when mom has to throw the bike in the trunk of the car. (been there many times :lol: ). Anything else you need to know bicycle related, just ask. I know way more than is probably good for me (about bikes that is).
-Will :lol:
Last edited by wok on Wed Feb 14, 2007 7:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby toypusher » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:51 pm

Will,

That link to Burly is not correct. Try this one: Burly
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Postby wok » Wed Feb 14, 2007 6:56 pm

OOPS!! we were both wrong actually :thinking: . I left out the E http://www.burley.com/ Sorry about that, and thanks for the headsup! :applause:
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