AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby Socal Tom » Fri May 12, 2017 12:21 pm

2manytoyz wrote:My question on thise fans would be at what static pressure are they producing that airflow. A 5" flex duct only carries about 50 cfm at .5 in/wc if the static rating for those fans is near that then you will potentially shorten the life of the fan considerably. I do residental and commercial hvac for anliving and a 5000 btu unit (.417 ton unit) by industry norms needs about 167 cfm. Am i missing something that is radically different with using this type of unit as I am planning a similar design for my camper.

Brian

How long a run are your numbers based on? my guess is 100ft. Mine are only 5ft long, so a much higher CFM would be expected. The A/C units cost about $100 and they last for years under the short term conditions like these. If static pressure is shortening their life expectancy its not enough to show up under these conditions. According to the manufacture of mine the fan puts out between 111 and 136 cfm. I suspect that fans in these units are designed to push pretty hard, given that they have to suck across a pretty tight coil and then blow the air across the room.
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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby 2manytoyz » Fri May 12, 2017 1:21 pm

Good to know they are holding up. I really didnt want to spend the coin on the coleman mach 8. Static and air flows are based off a 25' flex duct.
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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby Shadow Catcher » Fri May 12, 2017 8:27 pm

The Atwood 4000 bilge blower is rated at 230 CFM 125 CFM in system. I have ours hooked up to a PWM to adjust speed and have it running at about half power which is enough to keep the coils from icing. My bet is that it is making up for resistance in the hosing and keeping the air flow at 125 CFM give or take.
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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby 2manytoyz » Sat May 13, 2017 7:25 am

Good info I was thinking I was going to have to use a freeze stat to keep it from icing. I realy like the adjustable speed idea. Being able to slow the air down to just above freezup would help with dehumidification.

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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby Socal Tom » Sat May 13, 2017 12:08 pm

2manytoyz wrote:Good info I was thinking I was going to have to use a freeze stat to keep it from icing. I realy like the adjustable speed idea. Being able to slow the air down to just above freezup would help with dehumidification.

Brian

I still believe that setting up the return in a "cross flow" configuration is less likely to ice up. Unfortunately it doesn't get humid enough here in socal for me to prove it. I'm still using a cardboard plenum, so clearly water isn't an issue for me.
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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby 2manytoyz » Fri May 19, 2017 11:50 am

Has anyone tried using either a transmission cooler or electric radiator fan? I was actually thinking about taking the condensong coil off so that i could mount it on the sidewall through a hatch wile mounting the evaporator coil under a cabinet. Should be pretty easy to design and build a shroud and new drain pan. Then add a grill for estetics a relay a transformer and a thermostat.

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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby Shadow Catcher » Fri May 19, 2017 6:54 pm

Brian
Part of my thinking was that there are many times when I do not want or need AC and an integrated AC unit goes with you. I have an identical 'head unit' should the current one fail.
I do not see that there would be a real problem with a split system and actually investigated a small engine powered unit using an automotive AC compressor.
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Re: AC Hacking a Figidaire 5000 BTU

Postby working on it » Fri May 19, 2017 7:35 pm

2manytoyz wrote:Has anyone tried using either a transmission cooler or electric radiator fan? I was actually thinking about taking the condensong coil off so that i could mount it on the sidewall through a hatch wile mounting the evaporator coil under a cabinet. Should be pretty easy to design and build a shroud and new drain pan. Then add a grill for estetics a relay a transformer and a thermostat.

Brian
  • I tried a 10" automotive cooling fan as a cabin mounted main fan, since I am car-centric, and I wanted an automotive/industrial/farm & ranch kind of overall appearance to the trailer. There were three problems using it: 1) since I wanted it suspended from an overhead shelf, it needed a protective cage around it (the blades are quite sharp, and dangerous), 2) the amperage draw was too high (at full power, it would consume 6-7 amps from a 12vdc battery, running it down to nothing, quickly), and 3) the noise level was too much (intended for use underhood, a radiator fan was never meant to be used in a quieter locale, like a trailer cabin). I just tested with a fan I had as a spare in the race car shop (of my friend), where I was building the frame and exterior. I only entertained the thought until I connected it, and quickly disconnected it, as the roar was too much for me, inside the 4x8 cabin. I bought a 120vac 10" fan, which used a fraction of the power, was much quieter, and had a protective casing all around the blades. Much better.
  • If you used a cooling fan remotely mounted, away from the cabin, then it would work, and also have the advantage of being waterproof. But, you'd still have a power problem. A transformer would be needed for converting park power to 12vdc to run it, without depleting your on board battery.
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