Does this sound safe?

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Postby halfdome, Danny » Sat Nov 25, 2006 12:28 pm

Thanks Mike, That explains a lot. It looks quite large for a tear, must be more for a TTT. Is the 110 volt for the heater or just happens to be close by? I noticed last night that since I had the roof vent closed and only had the side windows open an inch or so this past week that the headboard doors are growing from body moisture. After preheating the tear last night for an hour with a Mr. Heater those doors were moist with water droplets. It may be also from our record rains. Just goes to show that no matter how well you seal wood it will pick up moisture. Sleeping in the tear through the seasons and different heating situations is really putting it through the tests. :) Thanks Danny
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Postby Juneaudave » Sat Nov 25, 2006 1:09 pm

Danny...Do you think your Mr. Heater is generating moisture or just condensing what is already there? I hadn't thought about it, but in Juneau, hitting that dew point wouldn't be so great.
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Postby halfdome, Danny » Sat Nov 25, 2006 1:13 pm

Juneaudave wrote:Danny...Do you think your Mr. Heater is generating moisture or just condensing what is already there? I hadn't thought about it, but in Juneau, hitting that dew point wouldn't be so great.

Interesting point well taken. I'll put in an electric corded heater in there tonight and observe the difference. :D Danny
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HEATER

Postby CPASPARKS » Sat Nov 25, 2006 2:17 pm

Danny,
Crack a window or open the roof vent and that will help with the condensation.
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This may be what you need - a safe heater for only $25

Postby Dave H » Fri Dec 15, 2006 7:55 pm

Check this out, a friend of mine showed me one last night and I think it is a great thing. I plan on using one in my trailer. It says it is safe for use in tents and vehicles.

"the platinum in the heating unit reacting with the burning propane that results in little, if any, harmful gas emissions."

http://camping.about.com/od/campinggear ... ortcat.htm


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"Guide Review - Coleman SportCat Catalytic Heater
There's no need to stop camping just because the temperatures have cooled down. Check out the Coleman catalytic heaters. They make several models, but I particularly like the SportCat with electronic ignition. These are safe for indoor use, and they burn on propane. The flameless catalytic process is what differentiates catalytic heaters from other propane appliances. Don't be confused like I was in thinking that it's the fuel that burns clean, because it's actually the platinum in the heating unit reacting with the burning propane that results in little, if any, harmful gas emissions. The SportCat is rated at 1500 BTU and burns up to 14 hours on a canister of fuel for about $40. It includes an integrated handle and a sturdy stand. I also like the ProCat model, which has a built-in fan, but it requires batteries. The ProCat produces 3,000 BTU and burns for 8 hours on a canister of fuel for about $80. Coleman also makes a carrying bag (about $20), which holds your heater and two propane cylinders. For safety sake follow the manufacturers guidelines for using this heater in your tent, and be sure to always allow for adequate ventilation to compensate for the oxygen being used by the heater."
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Postby Dee Bee » Sat Dec 16, 2006 10:42 am

At the risk of sounding like a fuss budget getting into other people's freedom or buisness (which is what makes camping fun) ....

Just remember that a teardrop is a small space with a very limited volume of air if enclosed. No matter what you do always keep a window or a vent open. I hope that we never learn that one of the forum members died because of suffocation during winter camping.

That's it for my 2c.

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Postby Micro469 » Sat Dec 16, 2006 10:56 am

A good sleeping bag and a good woman is all you need to keep you warm on a frosty winter night.... ;)
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Postby angib » Sat Dec 16, 2006 12:36 pm

Micro469 wrote:A good sleeping bag and a good woman is all you need to keep you warm on a frosty winter night....

Aren't those inversely related? I think a mediocre sleeping bag and a really bad woman are probably just as good.

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Postby Leon » Sat Dec 16, 2006 1:43 pm

When they're really bad is when they're really warm :twisted: :oops:
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Postby halfdome, Danny » Sat Dec 16, 2006 3:09 pm

That's true but when your woman has a heat flash in the middle of the night you can wake up cold with no covers. :cry: Danny
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Postby rudeboysaude » Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:19 pm

mikeschn wrote:Even new, the forced air furnaces are not THAT expensive...

Here's how we put it in the Lil Diner...


and here's how I put it in the Baja Benroy

pic here

and don't forget Q's arrangement...

pic here

Mike...


Mike.

How do you get propane to that guy? Long hose? I'm trying to decide if I should leave room for something like that for maybe a future installation. Does the grill get hot. Do they make them any smaller then that? Thanks for the feedback.

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Postby Tripmaker » Thu Dec 21, 2006 10:10 am

I would skip the heater and invest in the best sleeping bag you can buy. I have a down filled North Face bag that I wouldn't be afraid to use in any temperature. The only problem with a down filled bag is if it gets wet (saturated) it loses it's loft and effectiveness. That should not be a problem in a TD. Being in the TD your are out of the elements, wind, rain, snow, etc. the only issue is the cold temp. A good bag will solve that.
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Postby rudeboysaude » Thu Dec 21, 2006 12:31 pm

Cool.

I've already got one of those. A Marmot Zero degree bag as does my wife. Thing is, I can get so hot in that I have to hang a leg out and she has it zipped so tight I can only see her nose poking out of the hood! In fact she uses it in the summer too.. So the heater would most definatly be a way to keep the better half comfortable. Guess we'll just have to try it out without and if it goes bad make room!

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Postby halfdome, Danny » Thu Dec 21, 2006 1:24 pm

Tripmaker wrote:I would skip the heater and invest in the best sleeping bag you can buy. I have a down filled North Face bag that I wouldn't be afraid to use in any temperature. The only problem with a down filled bag is if it gets wet (saturated) it loses it's loft and effectiveness. That should not be a problem in a TD. Being in the TD your are out of the elements, wind, rain, snow, etc. the only issue is the cold temp. A good bag will solve that.

We do sleep quite comfortably with three 30 deg sleeping bags but a heater is nice to keep the ambient air at a comfortable level and to prevent condensation on the tears interior. :D Danny
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Postby Laredo » Thu Dec 21, 2006 11:57 pm

Condensate is a real problem in a small enclosed space.

Consider a good sleeping bag or even a mattress warmer and a muffin fan (get a couple of "ice chip" cpu-only fans and set one as intake, one as exhaust; they won't kill your battery and just might make your tear a lot more pleasant.)
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