Beginners Tool Kit!

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Beginners Tool Kit!

Postby wa_flyfisher » Tue Sep 11, 2007 2:04 pm

Being a fly fisher and fly tier, I got to thinking that maybe like fly tying my fellow teardroppers could collaborate on a Beginners Tool Kit for TD construction.

I will finally have my garage ready to go. The time has come to start accumulating the necessary tools.

Tool kit guidelines should be restricted to the tools you can buy at the box stores, NO high-end industrial stuff and the like. (for example, the $150 table saw instead of the $1200 table saw)

Looking forward the see the list develop.
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Re: Beginners Tool Kit!

Postby Gage » Tue Sep 11, 2007 2:23 pm

wa_flyfisher wrote:Being a fly fisher and fly tier, I got to thinking that maybe like fly tying my fellow teardroppers could collaborate on a Beginners Tool Kit for TD construction.

I will finally have my garage ready to go. The time has come to start accumulating the necessary tools.

Tool kit guidelines should be restricted to the tools you can buy at the box stores, NO high-end industrial stuff and the like. (for example, the $150 table saw instead of the $1200 table saw)

Looking forward the see the list develop.

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Postby bobhenry » Tue Sep 11, 2007 2:37 pm

I'm almost done and no high dollar tools here. Some were yard sale finds.
Reversable variable speed drill
Decent set of bits
circular saw with carbide framing blade and a fine tooth plywood blade
belt sander
router (handy but optional)
jig saw and a bunch of blades.
Used the table saw at work but a lot of the ripping was done with a good
straight edge clamped to the work and the circular saw.
Measuring tape and a framing square
and clamps lots and lots of clamps these are your 3 rd hand in a lot of cases.

I suggest a kit bolt together frame for an economy build. Saves steel costs, welder, torches, and a lot of other rather expensive toys.

This is as total and complete a list as I can honestly remember that I used on Chubby and I am proud of the results.
Fastners ,glue ,paints ,and varnish, screwdriver bits ,brushes & rollers seemed to be the little items that added up the fastest but I would consider these supplies more than tools.

P.S. Gage said a hammer too ! I missed that but I am sure I must have needed an "adjusting tool" at some time during the build.
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Postby Bill Fernandez » Tue Sep 11, 2007 3:02 pm

Good luck on the tools buy cheap and they burn up and buy again .


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TOOLS

Postby MARVIN THOMPSON » Tue Sep 11, 2007 3:27 pm

I USED MY ROUTER A LOT, WITH A FLUSH TRIMING BIT.I MADE TEMPLATES FOR EVERYTHING. AND A BIG HAMMER IS ALWAYS USEFUL :lol:
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Postby Laredo » Tue Sep 11, 2007 4:18 pm

well, at a minimum you should have a hammer, brace and bits, a keyhole saw, a regular wood saw, one large and two small screwdrivers, a wood rasp and a really good plane, and all the clamps you can find.

bits, nails or screws, rags, glue, varnish or paint, and your choice of wood, of course.

being not merely cheap but frugal, I'd consider getting as much as possible secondhand. Estate sales rather than garage sales, generally, though.

In lieu of some clamps for some applications, Steve Frederick uses weights. This is handy, as you can sub in heavy objects you already have around (boxes or jugs of laundry soap, cat litter, etc.)
Last edited by Laredo on Tue Sep 11, 2007 4:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Wolffarmer » Tue Sep 11, 2007 4:18 pm

I have a big rubber mallet as well as my big hammers. I use to work on farm equipment. Sometimes you just have to get their attention. 8)
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Postby rbonner » Tue Sep 11, 2007 4:23 pm

Check the want ads in your paper! I bought a craftsman radial arm saw and a table saw for $200. for the pair because the guy was moving, they were older models but work perfect. Bought a 16 in. planer for $40. from a garage sale. Jig saw get a high end model or you go through them quick.
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Postby Podunkfla » Tue Sep 11, 2007 4:46 pm

Everybody will have their own ideas of what you need for basic woodworking.
Gage has it pretty well covered... Although I'd buy a cheap router before a Rotozip?

Here is what I like to have at hand... more or less in order of preference:

Power tools...
Jig saw (saber saw)
Cordless drill & bits
Random orbit sander
Skill Saw & carbide combo blade
(make your own saw guide)

Nice, but not absolutely necessary:
Pocket hole jig
Table saw
Belt sander
Routers:
Trim router
Plunge router

Hand tools...
Tape measure
Hammer
Screw drivers
Combination square
Carpenters square
Clamps (check Harbor Freight)
Cargo straps

Nice, but not absolutely necessary:
Wood chisels
Block Plane
Cabinet scrapers
Miter box & saw
Small fine tooth trim saw
Quick change pilot drill & driver for cordless drill

A basic electrical kit:
Wire cutter, electrical pliers, circuit tester,
wire stripper, crimper pliers, wire nuts, etc.

If you have a compressor?
A couple small nail guns are nice:
Brad gun shoots up to 1-1/2 in.
Trim gun shoots 1-1/2 up to 3 in.

Also nice to have, but getting spendy: :lol:
Lunchbox planer
Bandsaw
Stationary sander, 6" x 48" belt
Jointer for straightening boards
Dado blade set for TS
Router table

Glue & adhesives
Titebond II or III - PVA glue
PL Urethane adhesive (in a caulk tube)

A few tips...
Planes & chisels need to be SHARP!
Here's how: http://www.shavings.net/SCARY.HTM
Making a Circular saw guide:
http://www.members.aol.com/woodmiser1/sawbd.htm

I use LOTS of "sheetrock screws" and keep an
assoortment on hand from 1 in. to 3 in. sizes.

As you can see... You can quickly get into second mortgage
time buying tools! I buy a lot of mine used from Pawn shops,
garage & estate sales and even flea markets occasionally.
But, I know what I'm looking for. I only buy name brand tools
like Porter Cable, DeWalt, Bosch, Milwaulkee, etc. that are in like
new condition... Still you can save 50% or more this way.

Too bad you are so far away. I have gobbs of tools and need
to unload some of the duplicates and extras I don't use. :o

Have fun with it... and good luck! :thumbsup: :applause:
Last edited by Podunkfla on Wed Sep 12, 2007 1:17 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Postby jeepr » Tue Sep 11, 2007 8:30 pm

You would laugh if you saw the tools I am building my tear with. I have an old craftsman circular saw, saber saw and belt sander that have to be 30+ years old each.

I do have a decent table saw, cheap chop saw, Craftsman cordless drill and an air nailer/stapler.

Some of the tools are a luxury that make jobs easier. You can accomplished a lot with a basic set of tools, when teardrop trailers hit the market I bet there were not a lot of power tools used in their construction.
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Postby Claw » Tue Sep 11, 2007 9:39 pm

Table saw, jig saw, drill/driver, sanding block, tape measure, sockets and clamps are the basics in my shop. I borrowed a router for one day.
It is just a funny shaped box with a couple of hinges. ;)
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Postby asianflava » Wed Sep 12, 2007 12:46 am

Brick, I pretty much agree with your list with one exception. I'd put the circular saw in the top bracket. Using anything else can be done but it'd be frustrating to do thereby discouraging a newbie builder.
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Postby wa_flyfisher » Wed Sep 12, 2007 9:16 am

I agree, between Brick and Gage, I think that is a great place to start. :thumbsup:

Also would help to have a basic electrical kit with the wire stripper, crimper pliers, wire nuts, etc.

If anyone would like, I can compile the list into Excel and can email it or possibly pdf it and stick it in my album for fellow new builders to have access to.
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Postby Podunkfla » Wed Sep 12, 2007 1:12 pm

asianflava wrote:Brick, I pretty much agree with your list with one exception. I'd put the circular saw in the top bracket. Using anything else can be done but it'd be frustrating to do thereby discouraging a newbie builder.

Yeah, I agree with you... So I changed it. Thanks :thumbsup:

wa_flyfisher wrote:I agree, between Brick and Gage, I think that is a great place to start. :thumbsup:

Also would help to have a basic electrical kit with the wire stripper, crimper pliers, wire nuts, etc.

If anyone would like, I can compile the list into Excel and can email it or possibly pdf it and stick it in my album for fellow new builders to have access to.

Yep flyfisher... More good ideas... I added those too... Thanks :thumbsup:
Last edited by Podunkfla on Wed Sep 12, 2007 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Wolffarmer » Wed Sep 12, 2007 2:00 pm

I have a 12 inch sanding disk on my 1955 shopsmith. I use quit often. Cut your pieces a bit to long, and you can quickly sand them a bit to short with an odd angle. Nail them on any way and call it art.

But honestly it is extremly useful but I wouldn't run out and buy a stand alone 12 inch disk sander. But I can see that one of those littler ones with a stationary belt sander could be nice to have around.

Get good quality basic hand tools. Never buy cheap screw drivers unless you need a paint can opener.

I have a battery drill I use to drive screws and a corded drill for making holes and I would advise doing the same. When you are using screws to hold glue ups in place you don't want to be switching bits or have a battery poop out on you.

Battery drills are also great to take camping. Chuck an egg beater up for pancakes. And you never know when you may have to drill something.
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