7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Converting Cargo Trailers into TTTs

Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby flboy » Fri Jan 12, 2018 10:17 am

featherliteCT1 wrote:Flboy,

My "auxiliary tank" was an open quart glass jar with no lid. The tube hung deep into the gasoline. Consequently, I know I had no leaks and I had sufficient "venting".

I cannot imagine why the generator would not suck gas more than a few inches up the tube except that the generator itself could not create enough suction for the entire height of the lift.
.
That is strange? In that case, you'd think the generator would stop after 15 minutes like the vent was closed? It has to be getting air from somewhere to release vacuum inside the tank. Assuming the original cap sealed and cut off flow after 15 min, I'd suspect the cap seal on new cap somehow or the mod for the hose. Very strange.

Not a permanent fix, but for troubleshooting, try some silicone around the nipple and secure the hose on it very tightly with a tie wrap. I am assumming the cap itself has a properly seated rubber flange gasket.

I am not sure your blow test would sense the minute amount of leaking that would cause the problem you are having.

Sent from my SM-G935P using Tapatalk
Don (Flboy)

Current Build CTC:
viewtopic.php?f=42&t=65498
Old CTC Build (sold)
viewtopic.php?f=42&t=50647
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FASF-x9ofMY - Interior
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wb-pvBbyyBs - Exterior
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby featherliteCT1 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:20 am

hankaye wrote:featherliteCT1, Howdy;

Having to supplement my fuel tank on occasion way back in the past, I found that
the connecting hose from source to target container needs to be full of liquid and
any amount of air in the tube/hose will stop the flow ... that said are you ensuring
that the tube/hose is full of liquid ???

hank

Thank for the input.
When I searched the web, the only portable generator's that suck gas without an elevated auxiliary tank were the Honda's with a fuel pump. I only found a couple of examples of non portable Honda generators using an auxiliary tank, and those used gravity feed with a primer bulb to refill the line. I am convinced that my generator will not suck gas without gravity feed and that the gravity feed method probably requires the use of a primer device like a primer bulb.
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby featherliteCT1 » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:38 am

flboy,

Thanks for the tips. When the weather permits, I will triple check that there is no air leak. And yes, both gas caps have a rubber seal.
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby Iconfabul8 » Fri Jan 26, 2018 2:07 am

So have you done any experimenting this winter to see how small of heater you can use to heat your nicely insulated trailer?
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby featherliteCT1 » Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:17 am

Iconfabul8 wrote:So have you done any experimenting this winter to see how small of heater you can use to heat your nicely insulated trailer?

Hey Iconfabul8,

Not sure if you saw Tab 9 of my build page, beginning at the post at Sun Dec 10, 2017, where I reported my initial test using a small 120 volt, 1350 watt electric heater, spilling over to tab 10, ending at the posts on Dec 29, 2017.

Walmart Space Heater.jpg
Walmart Space Heater.jpg (21.64 KiB) Viewed 294 times

This $17, small heater does just fine for me (note that I did have the front half of the trailer partitioned off so I was only heating the front 8 feet plus 2 feet of V nose area).

I am now contemplating how to deal with condensation on the windows, and around the aluminum frame of the RV door. However, I have been swamped with another unrelated project for several weeks now and have not yet had a chance to experiment on the trailer.

In due course, I am going to buy a bag of silica gel crystal cat litter at Walmart and make some large desiccant packets (maybe using old socks) to place in the window sills to help absorb the moisture. I will also experiment by opening ceiling vents to allow warm moist air to escape. We shall see.
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby hankaye » Fri Jan 26, 2018 10:11 am

featherliteCT1, Howdy;

As a fulltime RV resident, I've had excellent results with the venting method.
Suggest you try that before going the kitty litter route.

hank
Striving for a less complicated life since 1949 ...
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby McDave » Sat Jan 27, 2018 5:20 am

It can be a balancing act for sure. Hyper efficient insulating and air tight doors and windows would sound like the answer to all heating issues. However, too tight and the moisture builds and saturates the captive volume of air to the point of "sweating". On the other hand air that is too dry doesn't feel as warm and causes all sorts of other issues like static electricity and allergy/sinus/skin problems. Forced air furnaces tend to dry out the air because they pressurize the interior and force warm, moist air out through all the gaps and leaks when on, and that air gets replaced by cold, dry air. Most of the time we put enough moisture back into the air via cooking, bathing, breathing, and evaporation of potted plants and fish bowls and toilet bowls to keep the relative humidity relatively comfortable. Homes with radiant heat sources like radiators don't really pressurize to that extent and use the moisture in the air to carry the heat. Also they have less static and allergy issues because the air convects as opposed to being forced with velocity keeping allergins airborn and building static charge via molecular friction. In general there were fewer people with chronic respiratory issues back when homes were leaky and inefficient because the air was constantly being exchanged with fresh air, todays tighter buildings keep the same stale air captured and reheated. So, what do you do? A little give, a little take. Crack the vent open, like Hank said!
Just sayin'.... ;)

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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby featherliteCT1 » Sat Jan 27, 2018 1:34 pm

Thanks McDave ... nice explanation for why Hankaye's venting suggestion makes the most sense.
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby CoventryKid » Sat Jan 27, 2018 2:27 pm

I am now contemplating how to deal with condensation on the windows, and around the aluminum frame of the RV door. However, I have been swamped with another unrelated project for several weeks now and have not yet had a chance to experiment on the trailer.

In due course, I am going to buy a bag of silica gel crystal cat litter at Walmart and make some large desiccant packets (maybe using old socks) to place in the window sills to help absorb the moisture. I will also experiment by opening ceiling vents to allow warm moist air to escape. We shall see.

Having full-timed in our CT for almost 2 years now, we have our Maxxair fan and each of our 3 windows open no matter what the weather. Occasionally we have a small amount of condensation on the windows, typically in the mornings. We turn the fan on (low) when we cook or when we have a shower. Leave it on for a short while.

Overall, windows are clear; no major problems with condensation.

Hope this helps.
Doug
Vancouver Island, BC

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GMC Savana Explorer Limited SE hightop conversion van
NEO NAVR 7x16 V-nose aluminum trailer now a comfortable travel trailer

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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby McDave » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:23 pm

Here's some info from a guy who knows what cold is all aboot... ;)

Eugene Kizhnerman3 months ago

Here's a friendly advice from hardy Canadians spending harsh winters in RV's at oil and gas sites throughout northern BC and Alberta:

1) To winterize your windows, use special bubble wrap with flat surfaces on both sides (not the regular one with bare bubbles sticking out on one side) and attach it really tightly to the window glass while also covering metal frames surrounding it all the way to the wood trim. Keep it in place by running scotch tape all the way around it sealing it as best as you can. There's also bubble wrap with one sticky side which is absolutely ideal for that: it doesn't leave much air between the wrap and the glass/metal frame, thus eliminating condensation and frost. This material is also great in letting the sunlight in during the day (unlike reflectix/astrofoil) while providing good privacy at night (you can only see people's silhouettes inside even with blinds open). It's fairly easy to peel off in spring, but you might need to use a bit of rubbing alcohol to remove any adhesive residue from the glass.

2) You can also attach pieces of bubble wrap to the vent and skylight openings to let the light in without loosing the heat. I recommend keeping them in place using self-adhesive velcro strips attached around the perimeter of both the opening and the bubble wrap cover - that way they're easy to remove when needed.

3) Glue a large sheet of sticky bubble wrap over the top of your bed board under the matress to reduce condensation there.

4) To insulate the walls and roof use penoplene (look up either that word or 'foamed polyethylene'). This is a fairly cheap but amazing material very popular in Europe and sold on amazon/ebay in form of soft and flexible 1/4''-thick tiles with one self-adhesive side and another having various 3D decorative patterns and colors (some really nice). You simply glue them onto your internal walls and ceiling like you would regular tiles, and they boost your rig's insulation immensely. They are also fairly easy to peel off and/or replace with a different design when the old one feels too old.

5) Use self-adhesive astrofoil with one sticky side to insulate the walls inside all the cabinets (top and bottom) as well as all the basement storage compartments (including the inside of all storage hatches). Check the condition and sealing quality of the hatch seals (especially in an old RV) and replace it or beef it up using residential self-adhesive door insulation strips if necessary.

6) Use penoplene to cover the inside of your rig's entrance door, and put sticky bubble wrap on the door window.

7) To insulate the floor, you can use thick carpet or area rugs, but nothing beats 2''-thick interlocking closed-cell floor tiles sold in any hardware store (some sport equipment stores also have them under the name 'tatami mats'). They're also super comfy to walk on.

WORD OF CAUTION: Generally speaking, any extra insulation layers you put inside your rig MUST be attached to your rig's walls/windows/ceiling/floor tightly with minimal air gap (and not just covering loosely or being simply hang on the wall), otherwise the gap will fill up with condensate which will ruin your rig. Condensation and frosting around window sills are the main reason why all these other ideas like closing the shades or covering the windows with astrofoil or blankets just don’t work, not to mention they will turn your rig into a depressing everdark cave.

8) The biggest sources of heat loss (especially in the newer, better insulated 4-season RV's) are the slideout perimeter seals. Buy thick self-adhesive door seal strips (or cut 2"-wide strips from thick and soft closed-cell foam mats sold in hardware stores or on ebay) and glue them around the perimeter of the slideout behind the decorative wood trim where it connects with the external slideout walls so that when the slide is fully out these foam strips will be somewhat compressed against the internal wall providing a good seal. Unfortunately, this cannot be done at the bottom of the slide, so you have to identify the main routes of draft penetration on some cold windy day and improvise the ways to block them.

9) Avoid using propane heaters (unlike propane furnace or electric fireplace, they produce a lot of moisture).

10) To further reduce moisture, use microwave or electric toaster to cook/reheat your food instead of propane cooktop or stove, and if you absolutely must boil or cook something using propane then turn on the exhaust fan or crack your roof vent open to drive away the vapours.

11) Be very careful with electric heaters of any kind (even oil radiators - they can also cause fire if they trip).

12) Avoid showering in your rig as much as possible (use a workplace, gym or campsite shower).

13) Avoid drying loundry, wet clothes or sports gear inside your rig on really cold days when you can't air it.

14) Buy a good dehumidifier if you cannot reduce moisture by the above steps - it's well worth it. Remember: excessive moisture in the rig breeds mold and mildew which will slowly kill not only your rig but also its occupants, and once it's there it's almost impossible to get rid of.

15) Watch closely the inlet and outlet vents of your fridge (especially if you ever run it on propane in freezing cold): icicles tend to grow inside the space behind your fridge blocking these vents.

16) Don't bother clearing snow banks around or under your rig (it's a typical rookie mistake to think that they might accelerate freezing of your tanks and piping). Conversely - as soon as there's enough snowfall, pile as much snow as you can around the rig to attract even more snow in the next snow storm thus growing the snow barrier around your rig untill ideally it will completely close the gap between the bottom of your rig and the ground (this is especially important if you don't have a skirt). Also do not remove snow cover from the top of your rig and slide roofs.

17) I'd definitely recommend using a heat-traced water hose for hookup. In a modern 4-season rig with heated underbelly and tanks you may not need to keep the water running all the time to prevent the internal pipes from freezing, but I'd recommend to do this in extreme cold or if the park where you're staying doesn't have heated water hookups. If it does, it may be better to use it periodically to fill up your tank and run off of it using your water pump most of the time. In such case, as well as if you're boondocking, I'd also recommend to turn off your water pump and leave all the taps (hot and cold) fully open if you leave your rig without furnace running for any length of time e.g. before going to work or ski. Do this also before going to bed on extremely cold noghts even with furnace running. Do it as often as you can if your rig is not 4-season rated.

Good luck and keep warm

McDave
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Re: 7x16x6.5 Featherlite Build

Postby featherliteCT1 » Sat Feb 03, 2018 6:58 am

McDave,

With much thanks for the insulation tips... good stuff!
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