Benroy for my baby

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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby tony.latham » Sat Mar 10, 2018 4:31 pm

Tony do you remove the Staples after or just leave them in?


I make sure they are set below the surface and then seal the entire exterior with epoxy. I sure wouldn't want bare steel in contact with aluminum.

It would be a different deal if I were to build a woody. :thinking:

Tony
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby clamlamp » Sat Mar 10, 2018 6:10 pm

tony.latham wrote:
Tony do you remove the Staples after or just leave them in?


I make sure they are set below the surface and then seal the entire exterior with epoxy. I sure wouldn't want bare steel in contact with aluminum.

It would be a different deal if I were to build a woody. :thinking:

Tony
What's your opinion on the Staples or screws with PMF?

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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby tony.latham » Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:09 pm

clamlamp wrote:
tony.latham wrote:
Tony do you remove the Staples after or just leave them in?


I make sure they are set below the surface and then seal the entire exterior with epoxy. I sure wouldn't want bare steel in contact with aluminum.

It would be a different deal if I were to build a woody. :thinking:

Tony
What's your opinion on the Staples or screws with PMF?

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I don't have one! No experience with PMF.

How's that for help? :frightened:

Tony
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby clamlamp » Sat Mar 10, 2018 10:16 pm

tony.latham wrote:
clamlamp wrote:
tony.latham wrote:
Tony do you remove the Staples after or just leave them in?


I make sure they are set below the surface and then seal the entire exterior with epoxy. I sure wouldn't want bare steel in contact with aluminum.

It would be a different deal if I were to build a woody. :thinking:

Tony
What's your opinion on the Staples or screws with PMF?

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I don't have one! No experience with PMF.

How's that for help? :frightened:

Tony
Time to build #4 with PMF

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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby tony.latham » Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:01 am

clamlamp wrote:
tony.latham wrote:
clamlamp wrote:
tony.latham wrote:
Tony do you remove the Staples after or just leave them in?


I make sure they are set below the surface and then seal the entire exterior with epoxy. I sure wouldn't want bare steel in contact with aluminum.

It would be a different deal if I were to build a woody. :thinking:

Tony
What's your opinion on the Staples or screws with PMF?

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I don't have one! No experience with PMF.

How's that for help? :frightened:

Tony
Time to build #4 with PMF

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3000 using Tapatalk


It'll be glassed and then coated with Monstaliner.

That'll get your wheels turning.

Tony
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby Staryder61 » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:16 am

tony.latham wrote:You two need to quit sweating the skinning. :frightened: It's easy. (As long as you use 1/8" Baltic birch.)

Image

Image

Image

I use PL and a 1/4" crown stapler. The PL Premium is a LOT cheaper if you buy the big tubes.

:thumbsup:

Tony


I figured we were over thinking the skinning Tony,,, :thinking: Sometimes it just takes someone saying " Stop worrying and get it done". :D
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby clamlamp » Sun Mar 11, 2018 7:28 pm

Listened to Tony and stopped talking and started skinning.

Started off by removing the film on the insulation. I'm sure it wouldn't have mattered but best to err on the side of caution. I don't want it lifting up on me in a few years.

Put a lot of PL premium but I forgot to take a photo. Then, used a crown stapler with a regulated compressor and shot a crap load of Staples making sure to start from on end to prevent bumps in the plywood. I got most of it done and will finish the last area of skin tomorrow.
ImageImageImage

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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby S. Heisley » Sun Mar 11, 2018 7:47 pm

You mentioned PMF and were asking if anyone has done it on Plywood? The answer is basically a "yes". The black portion of one pictured below was done with canvas glued to plywood and then painted with standard house paint. It's been holding up for probably close to 10 years. Of course, it's housed in a garage when not on the road. It belongs to one of our tearjerker members.

Image

I would use TitebondII (or TitebondIII) straight from the bottle to get the best adhering and water protection. Once the glue and canvas is applied and has died, put two or three coats of house or marine paint over that. But then, I tend to overkill sometimes. FYI, the main difference between TitebondII and TitebondIII is that TitebondIII allows a little more drying time. Once Titebond is dry, it is said to be waterproof. Regardless of which one you use, before you apply the glue, take a damp sponge to the wood. (Barely damp, not wet...you don't want to delaminate the plywood!) For some reason, that seems to make the glue work better. My theory is that it may open the "pores" in the wood so that it can accept the glue better or maybe the dampness draws the glue in. That may be similar to what the foamie builders are doing when they water down the glue. It may enable them to eliminate the damp sponging step plus give them more drying time; but, that's a guess. I don't know if anybody has really thought about that.

Gluing canvas on wood and following with paint was originally a method used when building boats many years ago, before fiberglass was invented.
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby Staryder61 » Sun Mar 11, 2018 10:54 pm

Looking good,, you took the skinning step :applause: and I (bought stock in the manufacturer of staples) j/k :D David
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby clamlamp » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:45 am

S. Heisley wrote:You mentioned PMF and were asking if anyone has done it on Plywood? The answer is basically a "yes". The black portion of one pictured below was done with canvas glued to plywood and then painted with standard house paint. It's been holding up for probably close to 10 years. Of course, it's housed in a garage when not on the road. It belongs to one of our tearjerker members.

Image

I would use TitebondII (or TitebondIII) straight from the bottle to get the best adhering and water protection. Once the glue and canvas is applied and has died, put two or three coats of house or marine paint over that. But then, I tend to overkill sometimes. FYI, the main difference between TitebondII and TitebondIII is that TitebondIII allows a little more drying time. Once Titebond is dry, it is said to be waterproof. Regardless of which one you use, before you apply the glue, take a damp sponge to the wood. (Barely damp, not wet...you don't want to delaminate the plywood!) For some reason, that seems to make the glue work better. My theory is that it may open the "pores" in the wood so that it can accept the glue better or maybe the dampness draws the glue in. That may be similar to what the foamie builders are doing when they water down the glue. It may enable them to eliminate the damp sponging step plus give them more drying time; but, that's a guess. I don't know if anybody has really thought about that.

Gluing canvas on wood and following with paint was originally a method used when building boats many years ago, before fiberglass was invented.
Interesting how you use full strength glue, everything thing I have read says to dilute to 50\50 water. Do you want your canvas first?

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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby S. Heisley » Mon Mar 12, 2018 3:29 pm

clamlamp wrote:
S. Heisley wrote:You mentioned PMF and were asking if anyone has done it on Plywood? The answer is basically a "yes". The black portion of one pictured below was done with canvas glued to plywood and then painted with standard house paint. It's been holding up for probably close to 10 years. Of course, it's housed in a garage when not on the road. It belongs to one of our tearjerker members.

Image

I would use TitebondII (or TitebondIII) straight from the bottle to get the best adhering and water protection. Once the glue and canvas is applied and has died, put two or three coats of house or marine paint over that. But then, I tend to overkill sometimes. FYI, the main difference between TitebondII and TitebondIII is that TitebondIII allows a little more drying time. Once Titebond is dry, it is said to be waterproof. Regardless of which one you use, before you apply the glue, take a damp sponge to the wood. (Barely damp, not wet...you don't want to delaminate the plywood!) For some reason, that seems to make the glue work better. My theory is that it may open the "pores" in the wood so that it can accept the glue better or maybe the dampness draws the glue in. That may be similar to what the foamie builders are doing when they water down the glue. It may enable them to eliminate the damp sponging step plus give them more drying time; but, that's a guess. I don't know if anybody has really thought about that.

Gluing canvas on wood and following with paint was originally a method used when building boats many years ago, before fiberglass was invented.
Interesting how you use full strength glue, everything thing I have read says to dilute to 50\50 water. Do you want your canvas first?

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As I wrote above, I tend to overkill sometimes. However, I would think it would adhere better that way and maybe even make the wood more water resistant. Actually, you could probably do it either way. You could test it with some scraps and see which way works best for you. Adding water to the glue itself makes it easier to roll on and allows for a longer drying time; also, for large projects, the Titebond manufacturer does recommend the 50/50 method. However, if you are applying watered down Titebond glue to plywood, do so with care as you don't want to delaminate the plywood. Delamination of plywood is my main concern as I believe you are building with a plywood exterior and not a foam exterior; or am I wrong?

I'm not certain what glue was used on our fellow teardropper's trailer shown above as that was built before our tnttt group started advising using Titebond for that purpose. Titebond does not recommend using its product on objects that are going to be submerged (such as a boat) nor for structural applications (such as a trailer). Ah, well...I think our little forum has proven them wrong on tiny trailer structures and I've even seen it used on tiny boats! :lol:
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby clamlamp » Wed Mar 14, 2018 6:57 pm

After I finished installing the skin I got excited and mocked up the windows, fan, and driver side door for fun. It felt so rewarding to see the finish line. Of course I still have a long way to go.

I finished the face frame on my front cabinet so I installed it. I have a little bit of gapping up there so I might put some accent lighting. The center will be USB and voltage meter.

Next I plan to start on the galley hatch.ImageImageImageImageImage

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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby pchast » Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:56 pm

Looking good. :D
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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby Staryder61 » Fri Mar 16, 2018 8:01 am

clamlamp wrote:After I finished installing the skin I got excited and mocked up the windows, fan, and driver side door for fun. It felt so rewarding to see the finish line. Of course I still have a long way to go.


Stay excited... you deserve it..:D The finish line is closer and in sight now.. :) Everything you've completed is a check off, and your list gets smaller as you go.. it's looking awesome clam.. :thumbsup: David
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"Our build Journal.." http://www.tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=69528

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Re: Benroy for my baby

Postby clamlamp » Sun Mar 18, 2018 10:33 am

S. Heisley wrote:
clamlamp wrote:
S. Heisley wrote:You mentioned PMF and were asking if anyone has done it on Plywood? The answer is basically a "yes". The black portion of one pictured below was done with canvas glued to plywood and then painted with standard house paint. It's been holding up for probably close to 10 years. Of course, it's housed in a garage when not on the road. It belongs to one of our tearjerker members.

Image

I would use TitebondII (or TitebondIII) straight from the bottle to get the best adhering and water protection. Once the glue and canvas is applied and has died, put two or three coats of house or marine paint over that. But then, I tend to overkill sometimes. FYI, the main difference between TitebondII and TitebondIII is that TitebondIII allows a little more drying time. Once Titebond is dry, it is said to be waterproof. Regardless of which one you use, before you apply the glue, take a damp sponge to the wood. (Barely damp, not wet...you don't want to delaminate the plywood!) For some reason, that seems to make the glue work better. My theory is that it may open the "pores" in the wood so that it can accept the glue better or maybe the dampness draws the glue in. That may be similar to what the foamie builders are doing when they water down the glue. It may enable them to eliminate the damp sponging step plus give them more drying time; but, that's a guess. I don't know if anybody has really thought about that.

Gluing canvas on wood and following with paint was originally a method used when building boats many years ago, before fiberglass was invented.
Interesting how you use full strength glue, everything thing I have read says to dilute to 50\50 water. Do you want your canvas first?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3000 using Tapatalk


As I wrote above, I tend to overkill sometimes. However, I would think it would adhere better that way and maybe even make the wood more water resistant. Actually, you could probably do it either way. You could test it with some scraps and see which way works best for you. Adding water to the glue itself makes it easier to roll on and allows for a longer drying time; also, for large projects, the Titebond manufacturer does recommend the 50/50 method. However, if you are applying watered down Titebond glue to plywood, do so with care as you don't want to delaminate the plywood. Delamination of plywood is my main concern as I believe you are building with a plywood exterior and not a foam exterior; or am I wrong?

I'm not certain what glue was used on our fellow teardropper's trailer shown above as that was built before our tnttt group started advising using Titebond for that purpose. Titebond does not recommend using its product on objects that are going to be submerged (such as a boat) nor for structural applications (such as a trailer). Ah, well...I think our little forum has proven them wrong on tiny trailer structures and I've even seen it used on tiny boats!
I was told to try to smooth and level out the skin before applying canvas, what would you recommend to smooth with? Spackle, Bondo, wood filler?

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