Pop-up to vintage standy (first camp - sort of)

...ask your questions in the appropriate forums BUT document your build here...preferably in a single thread...dates for updates, are appreciated....

Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (air diffusers 3-5-19)

Postby aggie79 » Mon Mar 11, 2019 1:51 pm

I am really enjoying your build! Quite impressive. Thank you for taking time to photo-document your work.

les45 wrote:
MatHanz wrote:Nice work so far! I may have missed it, but what are you going to use to skin it? Aluminum?


I'm still trying to locate a source for the skins. I plan to use the standard RV type aluminum corrugated panels with the interlocking edges. There is a source near me just outside Atlanta and another on the west coast. I'm trying to figure the best price comparing shipping to picking it up myself. The metal skins will be on the sides and ends and I plan to use EPDM for the roof. I am currently paneling the inside and outside with the 5 mm Revolution plywood. I used that on the portable wall panels on my last project and it is some good stuff. It's primered on one side and very easy to work.


I don't know how current this article is, but it lists some sources for vintage RV aluminum siding. It also has a tutorial for DIY aluminum siding using coil stock:

https://nationalserroscotty.org/resources/siding.html.

Here's another link to DIY PDF: http://www.freewebs.com/kc8jwa/Lensidingfinal.pdf.
Tom (& Linda)
For more on our Silver Beatle teardrop:
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (air diffusers 3-5-19)

Postby les45 » Tue Mar 12, 2019 6:04 am

aggie79 wrote:I am really enjoying your build! Quite impressive. Thank you for taking time to photo-document your work.


I don't know how current this article is, but it lists some sources for vintage RV aluminum siding. It also has a tutorial for DIY aluminum siding using coil stock:

https://nationalserroscotty.org/resources/siding.html.

Here's another link to DIY PDF: http://www.freewebs.com/kc8jwa/Lensidingfinal.pdf.


Thanks, Tom. I'm researching three of the companies on that list. I want to keep the corrugated look similar to what came on the original pop-up and it gets a little complicated with the numerous sizes, patterns, and types of connectors. Their web sites aren't really clear on some of those features so I'm having to talk directly to their sales reps to figure it all out. I hope to order something soon since all my outside work depends on the sheet metal.
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (interior done 3-23-19)

Postby les45 » Sat Mar 23, 2019 1:23 pm

I'm actually building this project from the inside out so I decided to go ahead and finish the interior before starting on the outside skins. Just like building a house, the interior trim is always the slowest and most tedious of the work. With some decorating input from my wife, we finally have the interior where we want it or at least 99%.

Front end with two person dinette and small galley cabinet. Lots of shelves and hooks. The bead board at the top is screwed in place for easy removal and access to the clearance light wiring.
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Better view of the galley cabinet and drop floor. The lantern is actually an LED light that I picked up for $5.00 on sale at a local discount store. The triple coat hook is Judy's idea.
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Different view of the front end showing the door and overhead light. The dinette table created a little bit of a challenge when I tried to install it. Apparently, there was a slight difference in my new shelf and my old shelf so I had to raise the rear support on the table by about 1/4" to make it fit with the existing leg.
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Rear bed area. Again, lots of shelves. Note the LED reading light and old style incandescent overhead light. Empty window frames are installed just for looks. I'll wait until I get the skins on to finalize the windows.
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The metal trim for the drop floor was also a challenge but the aluminum was easy to file down to make all the corners fit together. The biggest problem I had with the metal trim was finding the pewter nails to match since Home Depot didn't have enough. Turned out Lowes had them too.
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A different view of the left side showing the bed area.
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I'm still in the process of finding the metal skins so I can't finalize the side wall framing until I actually have the metal in hand. I fully expect to have to add some horizontal framing for stapling the metal panels. In the meantime I plan to go ahead and insulate the roof and install the plywood paneling. That will be another challenge trying to reach the center areas with the tight head space inside the garage. Stay tuned.........................
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (interior done 3-23-19)

Postby greygoos » Sat Mar 23, 2019 8:43 pm

Very nice and neat job. Happy camping
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (interior done 3-23-19)

Postby S. Heisley » Sun Mar 24, 2019 6:37 pm

Good Job! :applause:
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (roof insulated 3-26-19)

Postby les45 » Tue Mar 26, 2019 2:12 pm

Installed the insulation for the roof area today. I'm using 1.5" foam board since the spars are slightly wider than 1.5". Can't really insulate any of the other areas until I figure out my metal skins and any additional framing I'll need for them. Cutting the 1.5" foam with a box cutter was a little tedious but everything fit well with little waste.

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I'll be traveling for about 10 days so I won't be able to install the 5 mm plywood underlayment on the roof until I return. I plan to use an EPDM roofing material over the plywood. Hopefully I can get my metal skins figured out for the sidewalls soon and get them ordered.
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (bending trim 4-23-19)

Postby les45 » Tue Apr 23, 2019 12:54 pm

While I'm waiting on quotes for my skins, I've been playing with the metal corner trim to see how it will bend over a 7.5" radius on the top of the front wall. I cut some of the old trim from the original pop-up and bent it over the frame and was mildly surprised that it bent without any distortion and the vinyl inserts went in without any kinks. The sides fit flat to the frame on top and sidewall. All of the other bends in the trim are flat shallow angles so now I know that the rounded section will not be a problem.

side view of trim showing no distortion
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top view showing how vinyl insert fit nicely also
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Getting three quotes on the skins has become a little more complicated than I anticipated. There are so many variables of thickness, design pattern, lock joint types, colors, textures, etc. and each company has its own terminology and policies. I hope to firm up the skin purchase soon and they all say they fabricate and ship quickly. Hopefully I'll be doing something soon.
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (skins shipped 5-8-19)

Postby les45 » Wed May 08, 2019 3:05 pm

I finally ordered and received my aluminum siding. I decided to use The Metal Company of Arvada, Colorado even though I couldn't find too many reviews on their work. As it turned out, they were great. I asked for three quotes from The Metal Company and two other name brand companies in the RV siding business. The quotes came in at $1,100, $1,600, and $3,000 (quite a spread). I don't think the high quote really wanted my business as their shipping from their Georgia plant just 100 miles from me was $150 more than the other two from California and Colorado. Fabrication and shipping was super fast. The shipment came in on a Central Transport truck with tracking and the crate was 12' long by 2' wide by 1' high and weighed 230 lbs. The packaging was constructed like a tank and the quality of the siding was first class. I ordered 16" panels in a pattern to match my old pop-up siding (3" Mesa-1 with S-lock).

Shipping crate was outstanding with mostly 2X8 sides and 1/2" OSB top and bottom. I was able to salvage a whole box of drywall screws which made the un-crating very easy.
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Quality of the siding looks great. Matches my old siding exactly and no damage to any of the 23 panels.
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Internal packing was also outstanding. I removed enough craft paper and cardboard to fill two large leaf bags.
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I'm still piddling with some small stuff this week and then we will be traveling for a couple of weeks so I won't be able to start the siding until late May. I also received my EPDM roof material last week so I'll have to install that before I start on the siding. Hope to get most of this done before the heat sets in. Stay tuned.
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (misc small stuff 5-13-19)

Postby les45 » Mon May 13, 2019 12:12 pm

While I'm waiting to travel this week (Danube river cruise) I piddled with some small stuff that I wanted to get done. These included a small shelf at the foot of the bed to hold a laptop computer for watching DVD's on rainy nights, a storage box in the front area to store the propane camp stove, and a framework to hold the electrical inlet fittings.

We use an old laptop computer to watch DVD's on a rainy night so I decided to build a folding shelf at the foot of the bed. All the materials in this little project were simply scrap stuff laying around in my junk drawers. The 3/4" plywood was painted to match the existing paint scheme and is supported on a piano hinge with two chains. It is held in place when it's folded up by a bolt and plastic wing nut.
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When folded down the top of the shelf shows the same hammered silver Rustoleum paint that is used to trim out the rest of the cabin area.
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I installed an AC outlet under the shelf previously for the power cord. When watching the DVD's, we use headphones for better sound quality and less noise for our campground neighbors.
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Under the shelf area just forward of the dinette was a wasted space where the old pop-up winch and cable system used to be. I used scrap lumber to build a box for storing our propane camp stove. In the past, we had kept the camp stove stored in the garage and on our last camping trip we forgot to pack the stove. Luckily a good campground neighbor loaned us one. This will keep that from happening again.
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The box is made with a 1X2 framework (Kreg jig and pocket screws) and the 5 mm plywood and simply dropped into the hole and fastened to the framework with a couple of screws. It doesn't fill up the entire space so I used some more 5mm plywood to cover the remaining opening at the top.
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The bottom is simply a piece of the bead board used to trim out the cabin. I'll use a couple of pieces of foam to pad the stove and keep it from banging around when traveling.
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All I needed for the electrical inlet was a small piece of plywood mounted to the wood framing with a hole for the fixture to fit in. Note that the door on the left is one of the four air inlets for ventilation.
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The electrical inlet fixture is actually the water inlet from the old original pop-up that I cut and drilled for the Marinco 15 amp electrical inlet to fit. We used this on the previous project also. I'll wire it up later after I install my siding and I placed it in a location so that I can also reach it from inside the cabin near the electrical center under the left dinette seat.
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Off to Europe in a few days and will start on the EPDM roof when I return at the end of the month.
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (misc small stuff 5-13-19)

Postby jdiebert » Mon Jun 24, 2019 9:35 am

Great build so far. Love how much space you have inside

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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (wall insulation 7-25-19)

Postby les45 » Thu Jul 25, 2019 2:06 pm

After a few summer travels and some 100 degree days, I finally had the time and decent weather to get back on my retro standy project. Originally, I planned to install the vertical nailers for stapling the skins and the wall insulation concurrently as I installed the skins. The metal supplier recommended a maximum of 16" on centers for stapling. I decided to go ahead and install the nailers and insulation first even though it meant that I might have a few extra pieces that I wouldn't use. The old shell frame in the bottom half had adequate framework for stapling but I needed to install new verticals in all of the new upper portion of the cabin. I had enough 3/4" foam board that I had salvaged from the previous project and a small amount of 1.5" foam board from the roof to do all of the walls without buying any new board. I did have one slight problem on the front wall as I had constructed it out of 1X4 that I had split and the actual width of the front wall framing was about 1 3/4". This required some shimming before I installed the insulation in order to keep it flush with the outer wall framing so it could support the metal skins (see detailed pics below).

I constructed the front wall wider than the rear wall mainly because of the wind forces that would be on it when towing. Using pieces from a split 1X4 resulted in the width being approximately 1 3/4". I planned to sandwich two pieces of 3/4" foam board in this area so I had to shim behind the foam board with 5mm plywood strips held in place with silicone caulk.
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My original framing was simply two halves with the spars approximately 12" on centers. I went ahead and installed the first layer of foam board for the full width of these two halves.
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After installing the first layer of foam board, I then installed the vertical nailers on approximately 12" centers. These are the pieces that the skins will be stapled to.
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This is hard to see, but if you compare to the previous pic you will see that all the smaller squares have a layer of 3/4" foam board installed making a total of 1.5".
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The rear wall was framed with a 3/4" thickness so all of the insulation is simply one layer of 3/4", also on 12" centers each way. In some areas where it wasn't practical to install the foam board (top of rear wall) I installed a reflective material mostly for looks as it has no real R value.
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The side walls in the old original bottom shell are 1.5" thick so I was able to use some of the 1.5" foam board left over from the roof insulation. This involved odd shaped areas and where it wasn't practical to install foam board (mainly where electrical runs were located), I used the reflective sheeting, again mostly for looks. All of the new framing in the top half of the side walls was 3/4" wide so it got only one layer of 3/4" foam board.
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Still a few loose ends to do on the wall insulation but I hope to start installing the EPDM roof material next week.
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (EPDM roof installed 8-17-19)

Postby les45 » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:30 am

Finally got around to installing the EPDM roof today. Didn't take a lot of progress pics because it was just too damned hot. Trying to finish up before the heat of the day but the humidity had me soaked early on. Installation was fairly straightforward but the tight headroom and the heat and humidity made it a bit of a challenge, especially trying not to sweat on the areas to be glued. I started by rolling one half of the EPDM material on a 3"X8' cardboard shipping tube. This would keep it firm and straight when unrolling over the glue. I then rolled the other half in the other direction around a roll of outdoor carpet until the two rolls met in the middle. My wife helped me lift the rolled material onto the center of the roof. I unrolled the carpet roll end toward the front to make sure everything was square to the trailer. I then applied the Dicor adhesive with a a 9" paint roller to the area where the rear part would roll out and then simply unrolled the rear half (cardboard tube) slowly over the glue. It actually rolled out very smooth with just a few small bubbles. I used a paint roller on an extension pole to roll out the bubbles and to lightly press the material into the glue. I then took the cardboard tube and used it to roll the front half back to the center to the edge of the previously glued area. Applied the glue to the front half and then unrolled the material over the glue and rolled out the front area with the paint roller. After getting the entire top rolled out one more time I pulled some tension on the edges and stapled the outer ends of the excess to the side and end walls. I will trim the excess off when I start the metal skins.

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Ready to start installing the metal skins.......................
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (EPDM roof installed 8-17-19)

Postby ricky herbold » Sat Aug 17, 2019 12:38 pm

Looks awesome. Great job!
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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (EPDM roof installed 8-17-19)

Postby Staryder61 » Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:43 pm

Turning out really great looking... :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Keep up the outstanding work you're doing... :applause:
David

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Re: Pop-up to vintage standy (skins installed 8-25-19)

Postby les45 » Sun Aug 25, 2019 6:04 pm

Finally finished (almost) installing skins today. A short piece on each side will have to be installed later after I re-install the axle and raise the frame since I couldn't get my air stapler under the floor. Also the front and rear panels near the bottom will be modified to include bright diamond plate on the bottom angle section. The rear bumper and the front a-frame interfered with being able to bend the full width of the bottom panels. The panels I used are technically called 3"Mesa-1 with S-lock connector. They are 14.5" wide and I bought them in lengths that were one inch longer than the 135" length I needed on the sides and the 80" width on the front and rear. I thought that cutting the panels would be a challenge but my old Wiss tin snips were able to make most of the cuts cleanly. For some of the angle cuts and holes around the outlets I had to use my Dremel tool with a grinding disc. For the clearance and brake light light holes I used a one inch hole saw.

Before starting the metal skins, I had to trim the EPDM roof material and left about 2" down the side which was stapled to keep it down flat. I then installed the top skins over the overlap area. This interface on the front and rear ends of the roof will be covered with a flat trim piece painted white with a white vinyl insert.
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The top side panels were critical to make sure all the panels below them were parallel and square with the trailer frame. For this purpose I used the exposed plywood floor as my datum plane and took all measurements from the floor.
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I used a simple jig to hold the panels in place while stapling. The panels had a slight spring bow in the 14.5" width due to the stamping of the corrugations. This bow was quite helpful during installation. The smooth top of a panel would be inserted about 1/2" into the S-lock in the panel above. By holding the bottom of the panel out and not compressing the bow it could be moved laterally with ease. When the panel was properly located, I could then push in at the bottom and the tension in the joint essentially locked it in place. I then applied the jig on each end and could release the panels to use the stapler.
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This is another (and simpler) jig that I used primarily on the full length panels on the left side. One of these in the center and one on each end would hold the panel tightly while stapling.
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Skins almost complete.
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Another view.
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Rear view.
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Next step will be the installation of the corner trim. These will be the 1" angle type with vinyl inserts.
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