Page 5 of 6

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 11:51 pm
by doug hodder
aggie79 wrote: While I love the blonde-shellaced birch finish, I'm thinking that a darker wood and/or darker stain would be better. For the wall-celing radius and the rounded cabinet corners, I have thought about using bendy-ply and then coming back with wood veneers (although I've never done anything like this.)


Just me...but a darker interior makes what is a small space, much smaller. Another thing...any sand scratches on a panel with a dark stain will show any marks/ flaws much more than a light one. Light stains/dyes are much more forgiving. Just my opinion. Doug

PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2011 1:05 pm
by whitefishpoint
I see alot of the same thoughts I had about how to make the corner pieces, out of balls, the metal ball caps, fiberglass over styrofoam....

Making the model was not the hardest thing. If you guys make the same trailer you could divide up the the work for the custom parts. If you can get a decent mould (the hardest part) then you can pop off all the corners for all your trailers.

You might want to design the trailer so the corner pieces are symmetrical, then you'd only need one mould not 4. Also since you can pick the radius, pick one where your other sheet material will span from the side flat, around the radius, over the top, and down to the other side flat perfectly so you don't have to waste material like I did. :cry:

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image


P.S. It cost me about $300 for all the materials to make the 2 corner caps.

If I could do it over again I would:
- Make the radius smaller so a 4x8 sheet of FRP would span from side to side.
- Forget the damn gelcoat and save the money. Gonna have to bondo the pits, sand it and paint in anyways.
- Don't try to do this in 50 degF weather - SLOW kickoff
- Don't try to add extra MEKP to make it kick faster, just turns it blue and cracks it.
- I would investigate the FOAMIES method on this forum for a possible way to make the corner caps. I've done fiberglass parts several times and I always hate it.

BE CAREFUL with that MEKP, That crap cracks the plastic tubes it comes in and if you squeeze the tube too hard it will break and splash all over. Thank God I had on an old coat and was wearing safety goggles! :shock:

PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2011 9:57 pm
by mvperini
Nice :applause: :applause: a very nice looking trailer you got there


mike

PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2011 8:45 am
by aggie79
whitefishpoint,

I have your build bookmarked in my browser favorites. I had been kicking around a breadloaf design, and after seeing your trailer, I decided that would be what I do if I build a standy. I really like your TTT, and particularly appreciate sharing your build pictures. Seeing how you did the corners helped me get a grasp of what I would face in building a breadloaf.

Take care,
Tom

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 10:15 am
by aggie79
As ELO, said "I can't get it out of my head." That is - the breadloaf travel trailer.

So, with preliminary approval from the CFO to start construction, I'm going to revive my post.

I'm still working on the internal layout. It will be bigger than I thought and certainly outside the realm of a TTT. Most likely it will be near in size to a vintage breadloaf travel trailer. It will have a full bathroom with shower, 2 near twin-size beds, and a kitchen. If there is a dedicated dinette, it will be for two persons only.

I have given up the idea of the trailer being garage-able. It will have to be "garage build-able" though. On my teardrop, I built it in modular components - walls, floor, and roof - and then assembled the components on the trailer. For something this large, I want to build on the frame.

Even with removing the axles and placing the frame on casters, I don't think I will have clearance to remove the trailer from garage. So my latest thinking is how to build with a one-time removable roof. Maybe the roof can built in 4' wide sections. The section would include the radius portion of the down to where it meets the sidewall. Then disassemble the roof sections, pull the trailers out of the garage, set the roof sections back in place, and finish the exterior.

Am I insane? And is it "breadloaf" or "bread loaf" travel trailer?

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 10:21 am
by Greg M
aggie79 wrote:Am I insane?


Yes, but in a good way ;)
I'm looking forward to seeing this come together. I've always wanted to do a bread loaf too, so I get to live vicariously through you.

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2013 8:20 pm
by aggie79
Trying to think through the removable roof part.

I really like the back end design of the Westcrafts. The problem is that the way the radius design wraps around the rear it doesn't leave a clean "parting line" for the roof to separate from the walls.

Image

So that probably means a canted back end like the Pierce-Arrow or the double canted back end like the Hayes.

Image

Image

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:23 am
by volster
I want to thank you guys for making my build more complicated. Since I am stripping an existing camper down to the frame, I have not started the build yet. I thought I had a plan, but the tear-loaf camper is awesome. Back to the drawing board.

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:46 am
by angib
aggie79 wrote:I really like the back end design of the Westcrafts. The problem is that the way the radius design wraps around the rear it doesn't leave a clean "parting line" for the roof to separate from the walls.

That's because there is no parting line - just like a teardrop, the roof continues right down the back to the bottom.

It's not really any more difficult than the other designs - the diagram below shows how it is split into flat areas, areas of single curvature and the two corners of double curvature. This is ignoring the trolley roof which is a separate problem.

Westwood.JPG
Westwood.JPG (67.96 KiB) Viewed 2348 times

I'm assuming you understand the terms 'single curvature' and 'double curvature' - as in all these designs, the single curvature sections are relatively easy to do in metal or thin plywood, while the double curvature pieces are a total nightmare in any material.

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2013 7:39 am
by aggie79
angib wrote:
aggie79 wrote:I really like the back end design of the Westcrafts. The problem is that the way the radius design wraps around the rear it doesn't leave a clean "parting line" for the roof to separate from the walls.

That's because there is no parting line - just like a teardrop, the roof continues right down the back to the bottom.

It's not really any more difficult than the other designs - the diagram below shows how it is split into flat areas, areas of single curvature and the two corners of double curvature. This is ignoring the trolley roof which is a separate problem.

Westwood.JPG


Thank you for that drawing. I can see the parting lines now. I do love the trolley top element, but I had not planned on doing that.

angib wrote:I'm assuming you understand the terms 'single curvature' and 'double curvature' - as in all these designs, the single curvature sections are relatively easy to do in metal or thin plywood, while the double curvature pieces are a total nightmare in any material.


Yes, I had thought about this. I think I could have executed this design, by doing framing similar to below, laminating 2-3 layers of 3mm ply, sanding, epoxy and micro-balloons, and more sanding. (Thank you to "pebo" on this forum for this drawing and a possible way to construct this design.) I didn't realize this but you can see the parting lines in this drawing.

Image

In the end I decided that the single curvature would be much easier to build, particularly with the limited confines of my garage. I will probably use the Pierce Arrow Travelodge back end.

Sincerely,
Tom

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2013 5:27 am
by Irmo Atomics
I'm looking forward to watching this one! If you can find an old camper and tear it down for vintage parts and the frame, you can save a lot on materials cost. (and the number one rule when tearing down an old trailer is: don't throw anything away - you'll need it later)

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:06 pm
by dodgedartgt
Tom,

I"m curious... Where are you on this project now?

Mike in FL

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 5:20 pm
by aggie79
dodgedartgt wrote:Tom,

I"m curious... Where are you on this project now?

Mike in FL


Hi Mike,

I was working toward starting this project, but life has thrown us some curveballs.

My father passed away a month ago after a protracted illness. With helping him and my mom, and doing a lot of repairs to their 30 year old home, I haven't had time to get some needed work done on our home.

Long story short - I'm probably looking at maybe starting some time this fall.

Take care,
Tom

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 11:20 pm
by dodgedartgt
Thnx Tom,

Sorry to hear of your loss.

Do me a favor, please. PM me when you do get started. The only thing I don't like about this forum is not being able to "subscribe" to specific threads like on other forum configurations. That way, any activity pops up on my email without having to go in a specifically search.

Mike in FL

Re: breadloaf construction method

PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 7:07 am
by 48Rob
Tom,

Same here, sorry to hear of your Dad.

Mike,

When I post in a thread I get notifications each time there is activity.
I don't recall if it is automatic or if I checked a box somewhere in control settings.

Rob