Canvas application question for GPW

Canvas covered foamies (Thrifty Alternatives...)

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Canvas application question for GPW

Postby JazzVinyl » Wed Sep 04, 2019 8:55 pm

You folks say "try applying PMF on a cooler first"...and that is what I am doing.

On this page (about 4 messages from the bottom):
viewtopic.php?f=55&t=63228&start=45

GPW says to use thinned TB2 to secure the canvas to the foam and let it dry. Then to use a coat of primer over that and emphatically says NOT to use another coat of TB2 at this stage.

When working on my cooler, I used 50/50 thinned TB2 to secure the canvas to the foam, I let it dry, then applied another coat of 50/50 thinned TB2, let that dry, and am now in Primer/Final Latex stages...

Seems to have worked great, so I am wondering why GPW says not to use thinned TB2 over the dried attached canvas?

Cheers!
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Re: Canvas application question for GPW

Postby GPW » Thu Sep 05, 2019 5:37 am

Jazz, that was FOUR years ago !!! :o And as we’ve all learned around here , things change as this collective group testing proceeds . Even materials change ( availability ) , we never stop testing .

And in context , this was adressing : “ We’d like to bring up a point . In the past we’ve known crafters who get a cracked antique' finish by painting over a freshly glued (elmers) surface . “ ( see: antiquing methods ) https://sarahjoyblog.com/diy-vintage-cr ... nt-effect/
No worries , we edited the original to remove the “warning” ;)
Basically , Covering TODAY is more a procedure … I’ll try to get it right ... :lol:
1. wipe foam down with alcohol to remove oils and contamination .
2. coat both canvas ( damp canvas if you like ) and foam liberally with your glue of choice ( or adhesive primer) , then stick together
3. flatten with roller or plastic Bondo spreader ( or whatever works for you )
4. once dry “size” the canvas with thinned T2  or primer ( thin it as much as you want up to 75%) … the intent is to encapsulate the individual fibers rendering them long term waterproof “.
5. Prime and sand if you like .
6. Paint it with at least two coats of a GOOD exterior water based House paint … ( even Oops paint is Good as long as it’s Good quality paint )
7. Go camping , have FUN !!! :D

And , oh yeah , don’t believe anything you read that I post ,especially the older stuff, as new materials , testing by people here much smarter than me , and better procedures happen , I change my mind ... :o That’s why we never tried to make any “ rules “ … It’s all what works for You !!!
There’s no place like Foam !
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Re: Canvas application question for GPW

Postby JazzVinyl » Thu Sep 05, 2019 7:29 am

GPW wrote: Basically , Covering TODAY is more a procedure … I’ll try to get it right ... :lol:
1. wipe foam down with alcohol to remove oils and contamination .
2. coat both canvas ( damp canvas if you like ) and foam liberally with your glue of choice ( or adhesive primer) , then stick together
3. flatten with roller or plastic Bondo spreader ( or whatever works for you )
4. once dry “size” the canvas with thinned T2  or primer ( thin it as much as you want up to 75%) … the intent is to encapsulate the individual fibers rendering them long term waterproof “.
5. Prime and sand if you like .
6. Paint it with at least two coats of a GOOD exterior water based House paint … ( even Oops paint is Good as long as it’s Good quality paint )
7. Go camping , have FUN !!! :D


Sounds good, GPW.

On your first six steps, I believe I complied with all. My insulated cooler looks okay and works great, will post a few photos when it all fully dries.

I used the Gorilla "Construction Adhesive" sold in a caulk tube. Was surprised it looked like caulk, applied like caulk, dried white like caulk and was very easy to work with, appears to hold very well. Do think this suitable for gluing the 2 inch foam to the trailer? Want to build a very basic sleeper like ghcoe's "#2".

.
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Re: Canvas application question for GPW

Postby RJ Howell » Thu Sep 05, 2019 8:28 am

Following on the tube adhesive. I am used to the GG and water, so I went that way. Curious how the tube GG works..
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Re: Canvas application question for GPW

Postby JazzVinyl » Thu Sep 05, 2019 3:41 pm

RJ Howell wrote:Following on the tube adhesive. I am used to the GG and water, so I went that way. Curious how the tube GG works..


Yes, this stuff:

Image

It is plenty strong enough to keep the cooler together, what should I do to test to see if it is strong enough to keep the 2 inch foamie rectangle attached to the trailer floor at highway speeds?

Cheers!
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Re: Canvas application question for GPW

Postby ghcoe » Thu Sep 05, 2019 9:45 pm

JazzVinyl wrote:
RJ Howell wrote:Following on the tube adhesive. I am used to the GG and water, so I went that way. Curious how the tube GG works..


Yes, this stuff:

Image

It is plenty strong enough to keep the cooler together, what should I do to test to see if it is strong enough to keep the 2 inch foamie rectangle attached to the trailer floor at highway speeds?

Cheers!


That is my glue of choice in my builds now. Expensive, but seems to work better than anything else I have used. I did some tests with a few products a couple years ago and posted here http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=55&t=6 ... =glue+test . I will bump it to the top too.

The real strength of the foamie wall to floor bond is not necessarily the glue you use on the floor to wall bond. Yes it will hold things together to a point, again the weak link is the foam. The real strength is the canvas that wraps around everything and is glued to the bottom. Effectively creating a sock.

In my builds I install what I call inner frame rails. Basically a base board that runs on the inside of the wall and is attached to the floor. The wall is then sandwiched between this inner frame rail and the outer canvas covering. This effectively creates a channel that makes the glue lines on the wall side and frame rail side work in shear. Shear is where the strength is at on a foamie build. This also makes the floor ridged right at the floor joint so the there is no floor flexing which could work on a glue joint. I do know this can happen because on #2 I decided to leave out the inner frame rails and had some issues. I then installed the rails and no problems since.

Frame wide body attachment 4 foot with cross ribs s.png
shear
Frame wide body attachment 4 foot with cross ribs s.png (10.72 KiB) Viewed 396 times
George.

Gorrilla Glue, Great Stuff and Gripper. The three G's of foamie construction.

My build viewtopic.php?t=54099
Working with flashing for foamie construction viewtopic.php?f=55&t=60303
Making a hot wire http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=55&t=55323
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