Propane: What kind of pipe is recommended?

Anything to do with mechanical, construction etc

Propane: What kind of pipe is recommended?

Postby jdarkoregon » Sun Feb 11, 2007 5:07 am

If I put the tank in the front of the tear, have have the stove in the back, what kind of pipe should I use, "black pipe" or Copper? and then, are there any suggestions?

John
Innovation is essential
The world can be better
ImageImage
User avatar
jdarkoregon
Donating Member
 
Posts: 1235
Images: 47
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:07 pm
Location: Oregon, Sublimity

Gas line from front to rear

Postby sdtripper2 » Sun Feb 11, 2007 5:54 am

John:

Have seen some carry their propane gas up front in a box with a 5 lb bottle
and then carry it back to use at the kitchen. Have also seen them use the
hose that would run back to the back galley area.

Here is a thread that might help you make a decision, John.

This is how Rob (48Rob) does his hose line:
http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?t=6884
Image
Picture shows his one pound bottle hookuP in the event his larger bottle becomes empty:
Note: Rob's (48Rob) one pound quick connect for the times he runs out of his bigger bottle.

Here are a couple of links for longer footage hose:
http://tinyurl.com/2zbmjx
http://www.mrheater.com/productdetails. ... 5&catid=52

Here are some quick disconnect fittings:
http://www.teecoproducts.com/Catalog/M3.htm

John, you might consider this see through bottle?
http://www.lpgastanks.com/propane-tanks/lc10
"A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country
is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards." -------Theodore Roosevelt

Steve
User avatar
sdtripper2
Search Garoux
 
Posts: 2162
Images: 168
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2005 1:32 am
Location: California, ... San Diego

Postby SteveH » Sun Feb 11, 2007 8:45 am

Rob definately has a nice setup and I'm sure he has put a lot of time and effort into it's design and installation. However, the fact remains, about 90% of the commercially built RV's use copper tubing. The pressure on a properly setup propane system is just a few ounces.
SteveH
Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented immigrant"is like calling a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist ".
User avatar
SteveH
2000 Club
2000 Club
 
Posts: 2101
Images: 42
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 8:28 am
Location: Bexar Co, TX
Top

Postby doug hodder » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:27 am

John...copper is your best bet as you can bend it around to conform to your needs without all the connections to make tight. Black pipe being rigid would just be more hassle, and cut to length, thread up the ends, or at minimum, buying a bunch of pieces to make it fit and taking back the rest...just a thought...Doug
doug hodder
*Snoop Dougie Doug
 
Posts: 12624
Images: 562
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 11:20 pm
Top

Postby 48Rob » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:31 am

Hi John,

Besides the two stated choices of copper and black pipe (steel) there is also high pressure propane hose.

Steve is correct that the line from the regulator back is low pressure, so the line doesn't have to be "super heavy duty".

However, there is/should be concern about vibration, flexing, and road debris contacting the propane line if it is exposed.

Flexible copper line is favored because of the ability to bend it around obstacles without the need to cut and add fittings as is required with black pipe.
While a good system properly installed doesn't leak, the more joints you have, the better the chances of a leak.
There are a couple low cost methods for protecting the soft copper pipe; one is to weld a steel tube under the trailer, and run it through.
The most common is to slide it through a length of garden hose (before flaring and bending) the tubing can still be shaped with the flexible hose covering.
In the end, it really doesn't matter what you use, as long as road debris won't damage it, and there are no leaks :thumbsup:

I used copper for the long run from front to rear, because my frame setup would not allow a single straight run of black pipe (my first choice).
At each end, I used high pressure LP hose, flexible, and very strong, able to withstand any flexing and chafing as it went through the floor.

Saftey note:
(The hose WAS NOT cheap rubber, it was very expensive 1200psi steel braided line designed for only for LPG high pressure systems.
A specialty shop cut the line and installed the ends with the proper equipment, no hose clamps here...
Rubber hose, gas line, and hydraulic hose are not designed for LPG. and will fail.)


The high psi rating was not needed for the very low pressure side of the system it was being used on, but because of its construction, it is stronger than any other product on the market that is flexible.)

I also favor it for the ability to go from below the floor to my cook stove with no joints to potentially leak, and because it is so flexible, I made the line extra long so I can easily pick up my stove (while connected) and move it around the counter for easy cleaning (can't do that too many times with soft copper...)



Rob

<img src="http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v284/1948rob/Cabin%20car%20project/STOVE.jpg"><P>
Last edited by 48Rob on Sun Feb 11, 2007 4:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Waiting for "someday" will leave you on your deathbed wondering why you didn't just rearrange your priorities and enjoy the time you had, instead of waiting for a "better" time to come along...

Visit Rob's World Web Page!
User avatar
48Rob
Super Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 3862
Images: 4
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 6:47 pm
Location: Central Illinois
Top

Postby doug hodder » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:35 am

Rob....if you ever decide you don't like that stove...I'll take it!!! :lol: Doug
doug hodder
*Snoop Dougie Doug
 
Posts: 12624
Images: 562
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 11:20 pm
Top

Postby madjack » Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:53 am

...just remember that you can't use just any rubber hose, it must be rated for propane...it's a cryogenic thingy!!!!

Hey Doug, I'll wrassle ya fo Rob's stove :D :lol: ;)
madjack 8)
A computer lets you make more mistakes faster than any invention in human history - with the possible exceptions of handguns and tequila.
most all personal problems can be solved with the proper application of high explosives
User avatar
madjack
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15110
Images: 177
Joined: Thu Dec 02, 2004 5:27 pm
Location: Central Louisiana
Top

Postby 48Rob » Sun Feb 11, 2007 12:38 pm

Thanks guys, but I think I'm gonna hang on to it for a while...

I looked for quite a while to find one, then got lucky and a friend offered to sell me his for a reasonable price. :thumbsup:

Modernaire stoves ended up in other trailers too, maybe from owner trades or sales, or could be that the company sold individual stoves (without having to buy one of their trailers or kits?).

They show up on E bay now and then...

Rob
Waiting for "someday" will leave you on your deathbed wondering why you didn't just rearrange your priorities and enjoy the time you had, instead of waiting for a "better" time to come along...

Visit Rob's World Web Page!
User avatar
48Rob
Super Lifetime Member
 
Posts: 3862
Images: 4
Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2005 6:47 pm
Location: Central Illinois
Top

Postby Dale M. » Sun Feb 11, 2007 3:19 pm

Simplest system would be soft copper tubing and flared fittings. Simple and fool proof and you can route it any way you need to .... Pressure is not a issue once propane has gone through regulator. Out put pressure of regulator is typically 1/4 to 1/3 psi ( 7 inches of water to 10 inches of water)... Just secure lines well so they dont vibrate when tear is in motion.

I would restrict rubber hose only to areas exterior of tear drop and only where readily accessary for inspection and replacement. The rubber hose will break down over time exposed to elements (under trailer).

Remember propane tank pressures can go as high as 175psi on hot day... Regulator is a must for most appliances. Exception here is some camp stoves and propane lanterns that require full tank pressure. If you are using high pressure appliances I do not recommend trying to connect theses with "plumbing" stay with proper hoses designed for the purposes ( they usually have 1 inch "disposable" canister connectors on ends of hose).

And...

If you have this device along you can always hook up your teardrops regulator to emergency supply (disposable cylinder)...


Steak Saver


Dale
Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

Any statement made by me are strictly my own opinion.
You are free to ignore anything I say if you do not agree.

Image
User avatar
Dale M.
2000 Club
2000 Club
 
Posts: 2620
Images: 18
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2005 8:50 pm
Location: Just a tiny bit west of Yosemite National Park
Top

Postby jdarkoregon » Sun Feb 11, 2007 4:33 pm

Thanks for taking the time to thoroughly respond to my request. I was originally thinking that the soft copper would be the ticket, but felt unsure it was safe. Rob, your suggestion of putting the copper inside a garden hose (for protection) made good sense. MJ, I’ll be sure to get the right kind of hose, and one long enough to allow me to move my stove to the side table if needed.

YOU ALL JUST MADE MY DAY! After I get the copper in, run a couple wires in the floor insulation area, I can close up the floor and get on with the walls.

The LongHaul is coming along in “teardrop time”. I sure like the attitude towards construction time that everybody has, exploring options before doing something have saved me several hours of frustration.

Thanks!

John
Innovation is essential
The world can be better
ImageImage
User avatar
jdarkoregon
Donating Member
 
Posts: 1235
Images: 47
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:07 pm
Location: Oregon, Sublimity
Top

Copper pipe

Postby Ken J » Sun Feb 11, 2007 5:01 pm

Its important to note that if you use copper, you should use copper rated for gas (I think its schedule k) not the hardware store stuff....

Ken J.
Ken J
Teardrop Builder
 
Posts: 41
Images: 5
Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2006 7:36 pm
Top

Postby Dale M. » Sun Feb 11, 2007 6:42 pm

After I get the copper in, run a couple wires in the floor insulation area, I can close up the floor and get on with the walls.



PLEASE do not put copper line for propane "in floor" area.... Run it UNDER frame and come up into galley area... Tubing should always be accessible incase of need to test for leaks... And IF you have leak in line it will not fill cabin area with propane. Also if line is under frame any air circulation will carry escaping gas away. IF it get trapped in floor it becomes a bomb if there is a ignition source.

Dale
Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

Any statement made by me are strictly my own opinion.
You are free to ignore anything I say if you do not agree.

Image
User avatar
Dale M.
2000 Club
2000 Club
 
Posts: 2620
Images: 18
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2005 8:50 pm
Location: Just a tiny bit west of Yosemite National Park
Top

Postby caseydog » Sun Feb 11, 2007 7:46 pm

I'd really want to go with a flexible, plastic gas tubing on a trailer. There is going to be so much vibration as you go down the road, it just seems like the more flexible your gas line is, the better. And no soldered joints on a trailer -- hat would be asking for trouble, IMHO.

And I agree completely that the gas line needs to be outside. Run it under the trailer, not through it. If you do get a leak, you want it to be outside, where it can dissipate easily.

That's my $.02.

CD
Image

My build journal is HERE
User avatar
caseydog
Platinum Donating Member
 
Posts: 12407
Images: 515
Joined: Tue Jan 16, 2007 1:44 pm
Top

Postby brian_bp » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:57 pm

It's impressive how much good information came out so quickly on this one. My travel trailer has iron pipe exposed under the floor, copper risers through the floor to each appliance (range, water heater, furnace, refrigerator), and a short section of hose to feed the pipe from the regulator. All of it seems sensible and appropriate to me, but if I were building new I would follow something more like Rob's copper+hose approach.

There is one part in which I would do it differently from Rob: that manifold to connect both the bulk tank and a disposable cylinder is slick, but it's easier to just carry an adapter and use it to connect the disposable cylinder to the same hose as the bulk tank (after removing from the bulk tank, of course).
brian_bp
1000 Club
1000 Club
 
Posts: 1355
Images: 9
Joined: Sun Nov 19, 2006 1:25 pm
Location: Alberta
Top

Postby jdarkoregon » Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:18 pm

Dale, I HEAR YA, Thanks for the great advice, you might have just saved my life, Pipes will go under the trailer.

John
Innovation is essential
The world can be better
ImageImage
User avatar
jdarkoregon
Donating Member
 
Posts: 1235
Images: 47
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:07 pm
Location: Oregon, Sublimity
Top

Next

Return to Teardrop Construction Tips & Techniques

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest