Hardest part of building a tear?

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Hardest part of building a tear?

Postby mikeschn » Tue Jul 27, 2004 5:11 pm

Hey guys,

Just curious, now that you've built a tear, looking back, what do you consider the hardest part of the actual building?

I think the hardest part for me was the interior skin. If anyone could simplify the interior skinning, that would be the best!

So let me know, what was the hardest part of building your tear?

Mike...
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Postby beverlyt » Tue Jul 27, 2004 5:25 pm

Bob says the galley. Figuring out what space you need in the galley for everything.... and making sure you've still got the room you want inside.
Our stuff doesn't fit when the hatch is down.
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Postby R Keller » Tue Jul 27, 2004 6:09 pm

Mike,

You could do what I did: build the sides (and the floor, and roof, except for the curved front of the roof) as complete composite panels (inside plywood - framing/insulation - outside plywood) and then assemble. This wasn't any simpler by any means, but then when I assembled everything, at least my interior was already done (and pre-finished)! You have to really think about how you're going to wire everything though!

I think Bev is right, every inch (and sometimes every 1/8"!) of space matters in trailers this small. I looked at a lot of sailboats for space-saving/multiple-use ideas for both the galley and the main body.

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Postby mikeschn » Tue Jul 27, 2004 6:37 pm

Actually, I was thinking about laying the plywood down on the floor, gluing the stringers to it, and then bending and gluing the plywood and stringers to the sidewall.

What do you think, would that work?

Mike...
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Postby Ross Wade » Tue Jul 27, 2004 6:58 pm

Now that mine is done, the interior skin was a bit of a problem for me. Especially the ceiling, that's why I upholstered our ceiling. Figuring out the space in the galley was another issue. But the worst for me was the fiberglass and epoxy.

I learned a lot and I guess that's what it's all about. The sad thing is, I am going to do it again.

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Postby R Keller » Tue Jul 27, 2004 7:04 pm

Mike: are you talking about the interior roof plywood? If so, yes. That's how I did the interior plywood for the front roof curve of the Road Toad. I got that idea from someone on one of the forums (sorry - can't remember now, but thank you whoever you are)

Below is a photo. It isn't the best shot, but you can kind of see what I did. Since the rest of the roof is flat, I built separate composite panels and installed them. And then I built the curved section in place. I glued three 1x2 stringers to the plywood (one 4-foot wide piece in the middle and two 4.5" pieces on the ends), screwed one stringer into the adjacent panel, and then bent the whole piece into place. Worked like a charm. And I had only a 14" radius.

Then I used two pieces of 3/4" Styrofoam (blue board) insulation doubled up and epoxied them into place using the exterior plywood as a clamp. The 3/4" thick pieces took the radius with a little coaxing, but 1.5" material would snap at that radius

You could certainly use this method for a larger curved section/roof.

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Postby Shrug53 » Tue Jul 27, 2004 7:14 pm

Here is a crazy idea. How about those self stick kitchen tiles? They have some that look like wood. They bend easily and have a very strong adhesive.
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Postby Steve Frederick » Tue Jul 27, 2004 7:36 pm

For me the hatch, cutting it from the sides to match, was a heart-stopper. I was concerned that I would mess up the fit.
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Then came figuring out the sealing system
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But, it worked out! Everything else was just good old "hard work".
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Postby mikeschn » Tue Jul 27, 2004 7:54 pm

R Keller wrote:Mike: are you talking about the interior roof plywood? If so, yes. That's how I did the interior plywood for the front roof curve of the Road Toad. I got that idea from someone on one of the forums
You could certainly use this method for a larger curved section/roof.

Rik


Yes, that's exactly what I am talking about. I figured it would make construction a whole lot easier. The only other thing I'd like to figure out is how to hide the edge of the roof plywood, without using a trim molding.

:wink:

Mike...

P.S. Sorry Shrug, those kitchen tiles won't cut it!
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Postby ALAN GEDDES » Tue Jul 27, 2004 8:38 pm

Biggest pain for me is the front/top outer skin. First tear went easy. This one I've done twice. Alan
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Re: Hardest part of building a tear?

Postby Larry Messaros » Tue Jul 27, 2004 11:05 pm

mikeschn wrote:Hey guys,

I think the hardest part for me was the interior skin. If anyone could simplify the interior skinning, that would be the best!

Mike...


Although I have not tried with a teardrop yet, I still plan on doing the same as what I did with my camper. Start with the side framing on a flat surface, then glue and nail the paneling to the frame, then put frame in place.

Voila!, inside paneling is now complete. This solves having to cut and fit angles and curves inside. Roof paneling will go in last when all inside cabinets have been done.

It's building from the inside out. For the corners I went down to the RV shop and bought some welting that is stapled onto the wall before assembly and it finishes off the corners very nicely.
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Postby JamesW » Tue Jul 27, 2004 11:25 pm

Well I just started building with an old slightly rusted trailer. I was having a difficult time grinding the trailer for a fresh coat of primer and paint. After several Coronas, I broke down and took it to a sandblaster. It should be finished tomorrow or Thursday.
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Postby engled » Wed Jul 28, 2004 9:03 am

I guess my biggest fight was the doors, I bet I mounted and remounted them 15 times. But they fit, close, lock and there water tight. :D
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Postby Chip » Wed Jul 28, 2004 9:12 am

I havent tackled the galley hatch yet but so far its by far the cabinets,,If or when I get around to another one I am just gonna sketch out what I want and take it to a cabinet maker and have it built ,,modular and temporary it in place ,,tip up and secure the walls and at least I dont have to fight doors and shelves that dont fit thru openings or are 1/8" too large or small,,second pre build is the hatch,,I would build it second and then make the rear match the hatch rather than versa visa,,,

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Postby shil » Wed Jul 28, 2004 11:41 am

Mine's so simple that I had no problems with the build. I'm having a hell of a time finishing it off, the details are killing me.

How to keep the rain out?
How to hold the windows shut?
How to hold the windows open?
How to arrange things in the galley?
Where do I bolt down the battery?

I had the trailer built in two months. It's taking another two to finish things. But I am getting there.
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