Teardrop Heat, Coleman Survival Heater

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Teardrop Heat, Coleman Survival Heater

Postby len19070 » Sat Oct 15, 2005 4:50 am

Last weekend I went camping in an awful rain storm 6.5" of rain. It rained for 56 hours straight. Lots of fun. But I got a chance to use my Coleman Survival heater. 800BTU's, a long and slow heat. More for the dampness. 800BTU's is not a lot, but it was more than enough to heat the tear dry and toasty at only 1/2 strength. I just placed it in my rear cabinet and it worked very well. The first night I kept an eye on it for getting to hot on the cabinet but a thermometer said it only got 80 degrees on the cabinet rail above it. They say keep it 12" away from anything and I was about 9" (I think a small removable heat shield is in order). The cabin was a nice 70 degrees with plenty of throttle left. I had a 3000BTU Coleman but it blew me out of the cabin.

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Happy Trails

Len

BTW keep a window cracked.
Last edited by len19070 on Sat Oct 15, 2005 5:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby mikeschn » Sat Oct 15, 2005 5:13 am

Weren't you in the least bit worried about carbon monoxide poisioning? Especally in light of information like this:

Consumer Product Safety Commission
CPSC Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning with Camping Equipment
CPSC Document #5008

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns consumers that each year there are about 30 deaths and 450 injuries because of carbon monoxide poisoning from the use of portable camping heaters, lanterns, or stoves inside tents, campers, and vehicles. Follow these guidelines to prevent this colorless, odorless gas from poisoning you and your family.

* Do not use portable heaters or lanterns while sleeping in enclosed areas such as tents, campers, and other vehicles. This is especially important at high altitudes, where the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning is increased.

* Know the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning: headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, sleepiness, and confusion. Carbon monoxide reduces the blood's ability to carry oxygen. Low blood oxygen levels can result in loss of consciousness and death.

* See a doctor if you or a member of your family develops cold or flu-like symptoms while camping. Carbon monoxide poisoning, which can easily be mistaken for a cold or flu, is often detected too late.

* Alcohol consumption and drug use increase the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning.

* Carbon monoxide is especially toxic to mother and child during pregnancy, infants, the elderly, smokers, and people with blood or circulatory system problems, such as anemia, or heart disease.

* CPSC is working with the camping equipment industry to limit the amount of carbon monoxide produced by portable heaters, lanterns, and stoves. Labels warning campers about carbon monoxide poisoning are being developed for these products.
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Postby mikeschn » Sat Oct 15, 2005 5:15 am

And this:

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Deaths Associated with Camping -- Georgia, March 1999

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless, nonirritating gas produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. CO exposure is responsible for more fatal unintentional poisonings in the United States than any other agent, with the highest incidence occurring during the cold-weather months (1). Although most of these deaths occur in residences or motor vehicles (2), two incidents among campers in Georgia illustrate the danger of CO in outdoor settings. This report describes the two incidents, which resulted in six deaths, and provides recommendations for avoiding CO poisoning in outdoor settings.

Cases 1-4. On the afternoon of March 14, 1999, a 51-year-old man, his 10-year-old son, a 9-year-old boy, and a 7-year-old girl were found dead inside a zipped-up, 10-foot by 14-foot, two-room tent at their campsite in southeast Georgia (a pet dog also died). A propane gas stove, still burning, was found inside the tent; the stove apparently had been brought inside to provide warmth. The occupants had died during the night. Postmortem carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels measured 50%, 63%, 69%, and 63%, respectively, in the four decedents (in the general U.S. population, COHb concentrations average 1% in nonsmokers and 4% in smokers [3]).

Cases 5 and 6. On March 27, 1999, a 34-year-old man and his 7-year-old son were found dead inside their zipped-up tent at a group camping site in central Georgia. They were discovered by other campers just before 9 a.m. A charcoal grill was found inside the tent; the grill apparently had been brought inside to provide warmth after it had been used outside for cooking. Postmortem COHb levels in the two campers measured 68% and 76%, respectively.

Reported by: R Wheeler, Covington; MA Koponen, MD, Georgia Bur of Investigation; AB John-son, MPH, PJ Meehan, MD, District 3-4, Newton County Health Dept, Covington; SE Lance-Parker, DVM, KE Powell, MD, Div of Public Health, Georgia Dept of Human Resources. Environmental Hazards Epidemiology Section, Health Studies Br, Surveillance and Programs Br, Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Br, Div of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health; Div of Applied Public Health Training, Epidemiology Program Office; and EIS officers, CDC.
Editorial Note:

On respiration, CO binds to hemoglobin with an affinity 200-250 times greater than that of oxygen, forming a COHb complex (4). The principal toxic effect of CO exposure is tissue hypoxia because COHb is less efficient at transporting and delivering oxygen. Poisoning symptoms, such as headache, dizziness, and nausea, usually are seen at COHb levels of greater than 10% in otherwise healthy persons (2).

During 1979-1988 in the United States, from 878 to 1513 deaths per year were attributed to unintentional CO poisoning (1). CO poisoning has been reported in many different settings, including homes (5), automobiles (6), and indoor arenas (7). The findings in this report demonstrate the danger of CO from portable gas stoves and charcoal grills, specifically if placed inside a tent or other confined sleeping area. In the United States during 1990-1994, portable fuel-burning camp stoves and lanterns were involved in 10-17 CO poisoning deaths each year, and charcoal grills were involved in 15-27 deaths each year (2). During this same time, an annual average of 30 fatal CO poisonings occurred inside tents or campers (2).

Evening temperatures often drop unexpectedly, even during warmer months of the year. Campers who are unprepared for colder weather may overlook the danger of operating fuel-burning camping heaters, portable gas stoves, or charcoal grills inside tents and campers. Camping stoves and heaters are not designed to be used indoors and can emit hazardous amounts of CO, and smoldering charcoal emits large amounts of CO. Inside a tent or camper, these sources produce dangerous concentrations of CO, which becomes even more dangerous to sleeping persons who are unable to recognize the early symptoms of CO poisoning.

To avoid hazardous CO exposures, fuel-burning equipment such as camping stoves, camping heaters, lanterns, and charcoal grills should never be used inside a tent, camper, or other enclosed shelter. Opening tent flaps, doors, or windows is insufficient to prevent build-up of CO concentrations from these devices. When using fuel-burning devices outdoors, the exhaust should not vent into enclosed shelters. Warnings about the potential for CO poisoning should be stated clearly in the owner's manual and on labels permanently affixed to portable stoves. In 1997, changes made in the labeling requirements for retail charcoal containers* more clearly conveyed the danger of burning charcoal inside homes, tents, or campers. Rather than relying on fuel-burning appliances to supply heat, campers should leave home with adequate bedding and clothing and should consume extra calories and fluids during the outing to prevent hypothermia. Continuing efforts to educate the public by organizations that promote outdoor activities or operate camping areas also should decrease camping-associated CO poisoning.
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Postby len19070 » Sat Oct 15, 2005 5:19 am

I didn't Sleep with it on. That's a definite NO-NO. As mentioned, I used it for the Dampness and only for that. I was outside the trailer 99 percent of the time it was on. Please Don't use this or any heater like this while sleeping. I did not mean to mislead.

For overnight heat I have 2 Cast iron Sash weights that I get hot in that nights Campfire. Then before bed the weights get put into a double walled metal box and hung from the inside window with a vent at the top. These weights dissipate heat over a 6-7 hour period making it not hot, but bearable. This is an old trick my Dad told me they did back in the early 50's. (when you could find Sash weights)

Happy Trails

Len
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Postby Jiminsav » Sat Oct 15, 2005 12:06 pm

I hate to throw gasoline on this fire, but i just have to respond..
If there is plenty of air inside the tear, via a open window or a cracked door or some other way that will not be blocked, then propane heat is as safe as the the heaterin your house, probaly safer, because you can see that combustion is going on the way it's supposed to verses just having faith in the gas heater gods.
the only way to die of CO2 poisoning inside a propane heated space is to burn it in a oxygen depleted enviroment, and some of the newer heaters have oxigen sensors that will kill the flame if they detect insufficent oxygen.

saying this, I would hope that if you have enough sense to build a teardrop, you would have enough sense to operate some modern day versions of yesterdays technology..
sheesh.
Jim in Savannah
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Postby IraRat » Sat Oct 15, 2005 12:19 pm

I kind of agree with Jim, but just to be safe, I'll follow the other above advice. I don't care if I MYSELF die, but my wife would never forgive me if it were her.

However, I'm a smoker, so my tolerance to this is well developed.

But I still plan to gain 40 pounds before January to deal with cold-weather camping.

And Mike--I really think that was a low blow to include that line about alcohol consumption increasing your susceptibiliy to this.

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Postby vinoscooter » Sat Oct 15, 2005 12:35 pm

Looks like a good little heater though,If it's used safely..Didn't know that btu heater was even on the market...I have 2 of that style,a 2000-2500 btu,& 8000 to 15000..might have to look into getting one..800 btu's for emergency use..perfect for a small space..Still when useing these things in a tear..you only need to be stupid once..Ya might not get a second chance..vino
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Postby TomS » Sat Oct 15, 2005 12:52 pm

I'm with Mike on this one. There are some things that I'm just not willing to risk. A couple of extra blankets or a cold weather sleeping bag won't kill us.
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Postby Normspeed » Sat Oct 15, 2005 1:36 pm

My 2 cents, I have a 3,000 btu Coleman Pro Cat (catalytic with a small battery operated fan built in). It's a fairly new item I think. It was marked on the box and in the instructions that it's safe to use in enclosed spaces and even mentions tents. The operation/warning label says to provide a fresh air opening of at least 6 square inches. (cracking a teardrop window 1/2 " would cover that). It also says do not operate the heater while sleeping. I stay warm overnight with sleeping bags. On a cold morning it's nice to turn this thing on for about 5 or 10 minutes, then shut it off. At that point the tear is 70 to 80 degrees inside. Stays warm quite a while because of the insulation. Still have to go out in the cold to start the coffee though.
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Postby Grandadeo » Sat Oct 15, 2005 7:30 pm

Plus you've got those 3 little doggies to keep you warm.
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Postby vinoscooter » Sat Oct 15, 2005 7:36 pm

Hey LEN.did the heater come w/a kit,surviaval blankets,waterproof matches,carry case & heater..Ebay there around 20 bucks shipped.w/kit..does that sound about right?..or can you find it w/out kit?...27 hr's a tank not bad..the listing said it'll keep a car 20 degres above outside temps..I would think most trailers are insulated a little more than a car...would even be higher...take care
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Postby len19070 » Sat Oct 15, 2005 7:57 pm

Vinoscooter

Thats the one.

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Its a nice little heater.

Len
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Postby BILLYL » Mon Oct 17, 2005 5:28 am

I don't no. Something about a device that uses fire as its source instead a small area. Just doesn't ring here. :roll:

I agree with Tom - give me a couple more blankets - and I am just find................

Keep that window cracked.


Just my 2 cents worth..........

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Postby bledsoe3 » Mon Oct 17, 2005 8:36 am

Vino, Do you have a Bi-Mart up there? They have them for $20.00. Jim
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Postby vinoscooter » Mon Oct 17, 2005 1:53 pm

YO. JIM..have 1 in ellensburg..120 mi...1 in pasco...80mi...been a member since the 80's..Have friends in both cities..will put a call in see if they could pick 1 up..THANKS for the TIP..take care... :)
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