what kind of drill bit to use

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what kind of drill bit to use

Postby peggyearlchris » Sun Aug 27, 2006 7:58 pm

:? :? ok guys and girls I'm trying to drill holes in the metal frame so I can bolt it down. I've gone thru three bits and drilled only five holes. I'm drilling slow but the bits get dull quick. I'll never get these holes drilled the way I'm going. What is the best way of doing this. :x :x :? Peg
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Postby doug hodder » Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:07 pm

Have you tried drilling a pilot hole first? like 3/16 then follow up with the diameter you want....that should be fine for what ever thickness you are drilling...but once you've cooked the drill...it needs to be resharpened...don't throw them out...but there is a big difference in bit quality out there...Doug
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Postby mikeschn » Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:11 pm

Peg,

I use a titanium bit from the local hardware store. I also spray it with oil/WD40 as I am drilling to lubricate it. My 3/8" drill (or was it 7/16") lasted me thru all the holes I had to drill in my HF trailer with no signs of getting dull... maybe a dozen or so holes.

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Postby kerryd » Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:11 pm

hi Peggy , what do you mean by slow ? are you talking the drill is slow speed? what size hole ? Whats the metal you are drilling? Most bits work best at low speed . And push like hell . Kerry
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Postby Micro469 » Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:14 pm

doug hodder wrote:Have you tried drilling a pilot hole first? like 3/16 then follow up with the diameter you want....that should be fine for what ever thickness you are drilling...but once you've cooked the drill...it needs to be resharpened...don't throw them out...but there is a big difference in bit quality out there...Doug


Also try drilling at a medium speed and maintain pressure on the drill. I find if you let the bit spin and not cutting, you can kiss it goodbye because it heats up. I've had a few melt on me.... :roll:
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Postby Sonetpro » Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:15 pm

Peg, Go to the harware store and ask them for cutting oil.
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Postby Kevin A » Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:23 pm

Peggy,

Any higher quality high speed steel (HSS) drill bit should have no problem cutting holes in your trailer frame. I agree with Doug and Mike that you should drill a pilot hole first followed by the size drill you want for the finish size hole and lubricate the bit during the process. Also, if you have a reversible drill, make sure it's drilling in a clockwise direction, as crazy as it sounds, I have seen situations where someone has tried to drill a hole with a drill in reverse.
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Postby peggyearlchris » Sun Aug 27, 2006 8:34 pm

:) thanks Doug, Mike, Steve T, Kevin and Kerryd. I'll make another trip to Mccoys and get smaller bit to drill pilot hole, cutting oil ,new 3/8 hss bit I was drilling at a slow speed and I'll save the dull ones. I think that's it. :lol: :lol: thanks guys :thumbsup: Peg
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Postby Miriam C. » Sun Aug 27, 2006 9:33 pm

Peggy
I used a titanium bit with a self starting tip ($11). Did all my holes with a Black and Decker cheapy drill. I drilled full power and Leaned into it.

Warning if you push too hard, and it cuts a big chunk it will lock and try to break your wrist. :cry: Have twelve holes.

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Postby Rev. Ken » Sun Aug 27, 2006 9:42 pm

Miriam C. wrote:Peggy
I used a titanium bit with a self starting tip ($11). Did all my holes with a Black and Decker cheapy drill. I drilled full power and Leaned into it.

Warning if you push too hard, and it cuts a big chunk it will lock and try to break your wrist. :cry: Have twelve holes.

Have fun


And if it doesn't break your wrist it tears your tendon and that means surgery, (just got over that one) Be very careful drilling.

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Postby madjack » Sun Aug 27, 2006 9:44 pm

hey Auntie M...I see y'all finally took those Ma and Pa Kettle "meetin' " clothes off and got a new avatar :applause: :applause: ;)
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Postby tonyj » Sun Aug 27, 2006 10:14 pm

I agree with the pilot hole, but the way I do it if I am drilling a 3/8 in. hole--I start with 1/8th, then 3/16, 1/4, 5/16 and then 3/8. If you start with a couple of new, sharp 1/8 bits, you can breeze through the drilling process. I never have used cutting oil, though I know it helps, I usually use a little wd-40. If the first drill is sharp, you don't have to use excessive pressure. The remaining bits follow the previous hole and each has to cut just a little metal to do its job.

Though it sounds like you spend all your time changing bits, drill all holes the same size before "stepping up." I am pretty sure I spent less than a half hour to drill the 14 mounting holes in my frame (2 in box, so 28 holes).

The alternative to the multi drill is a step drill bit, and you can get a cheap set from Harbor Freight. I have bought them for as little as 15 bucks for a set of 3.
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Postby asianflava » Mon Aug 28, 2006 1:50 am

You can definitely drill the holes in one shot with a sharp bit and a good amount of pressure. Of course, the drill size will dictate the amount of pressure you should apply. Drilling a pilot hole will make the "Hole" affair easier though.

A step drill aka. christmas tree aka, unibit will also make life easier since they are made for thin materials. Like Tony says, you can get them at HF pretty cheap.

For lube I use whatever is handy, WD-40, Marvel Mystery Oil, Air tool oil it all works.
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Postby Melvin » Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:08 pm

Rev. Ken wrote:
Miriam C. wrote:Warning if you push too hard, and it cuts a big chunk it will lock and try to break your wrist. :cry: Have twelve holes.


And if it doesn't break your wrist it tears your tendon and that means surgery, (just got over that one) Be very careful drilling.


And if you're using one of these Image torque monsters make sure you are standing such that the handle won't smack you in the stomach when the bit locks up. It leaves a very painful yet interesting bruise on your stomach, or so I've, um, heard.
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Postby Miriam C. » Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:21 pm

madjack wrote:hey Auntie M...I see y'all finally took those Ma and Pa Kettle "meetin' " clothes off and got a new avatar :applause: :applause: ;)
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:R :lol: Thought you'd like that one.
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