Plywood blues

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Plywood blues

Postby Tripmaker » Thu Sep 14, 2006 3:01 pm

I'm having a difficult, no impossible, time finding 4x10 3/4 birch plywood locally. 4/10 fir is available but does not look like it would make for an attractive interior. The exterior I plan to skin with aluminum. Anyone have any suggestions before I rethink my plans and drop back to 8'? I can order it but they are talking $160 a sheet, or is that the going price? :cry:
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Postby Gage » Thu Sep 14, 2006 3:30 pm

I got mine at a 'Door & Sash' store. Had to special order it and the cost was about $120 a sheet, cabinet grade. So check with custom wood working stores.

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Hope that helped, have a good day.

:thinking:
Last edited by Gage on Thu Sep 14, 2006 3:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby rasp » Thu Sep 14, 2006 3:32 pm

the seam will be covered due to the kitchen area, you will never see it and the outside will be covered with aluminum sot the seam will be hidden there too. use a scarf joint to join the plywood and no need for a brace there.
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Postby Chuck Craven » Thu Sep 14, 2006 4:34 pm

An easier way is to use a slot cutter in a router. Cut a slot in each piece of wood and use a spine in the slots. Harbor Fright has ¼” slot cutters. If the joint show inside you can hide it with a contrasting veneer wood over the joint.

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Postby mikeschn » Thu Sep 14, 2006 4:42 pm

Yea, what they say...

Since it's all covered in aluminum, just make a good joint and don't worry about it.

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Postby Tripmaker » Thu Sep 14, 2006 5:19 pm

Good suggestions guys. I think I'm going to use 1/4 birch and 1/2 ext plywood and glue them together offset 2' on each end. I'll have a 2' joint on the inside that will be hidden by galley cabinets. The seam in the front, on the outside, will be covered by aluminum like you said. I imagine liquid nail weighted down with 50# salt bags should do the trick unless you have a better glue recomendation.
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Postby madjack » Thu Sep 14, 2006 5:58 pm

because of its thicker nature, liquid nail doesn't have a uniform "squish" nature...I would use Titebond III of Gorilla Glue....
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Postby halfdome, Danny » Thu Sep 14, 2006 6:12 pm

I would seam your plywood and run the 1/4" interior plywood grain vertically like you see in homes and furniture. That is the way I was taught and the way I did mine, it's very easy. :) Danny
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Postby Chuck Craven » Thu Sep 14, 2006 6:16 pm

Like Madjack said, Titebond III or Gorilla Glue....
Gorilla glue you have to dampen one piece of wood with water but you only have to spread the glue to the other side of the glue up!
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Postby Podunkfla » Thu Sep 14, 2006 10:04 pm

Yep... Titebond III is the way to go. Gorilla glue is more spendy and may dry too fast for such a big glue-up? IMHO... :D

Edit; of course, ya could use epoxy, as in West System, Mas, & others... Plenty of working time if you don't put too much hardner in it. Dang strong & waterproof too. 8)
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Postby Ira » Fri Sep 15, 2006 7:32 am

You're not going to insulate?

I only ask because if you go with a thinner wall and frame it, I'm sure you can find the material you want for your interior walls, and get matching stuff for the ceiling too.
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Postby Tripmaker » Fri Sep 15, 2006 7:50 am

Ira wrote:You're not going to insulate?

I only ask because if you go with a thinner wall and frame it, I'm sure you can find the material you want for your interior walls, and get matching stuff for the ceiling too.


I wasn't planning on insulating the walls for several reasons. Simpler construction. I think, but could be wrong, that the solid plywood walls would be stronger to support the overhang, 10' TD on 8' trailer frame. Don't think I need the insulation because I sleep hot and am used to camping outdoors with only a sleeping bag. Framed walls do offer the advantage of having more places to run wire and more options for skinning inside.
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Postby Ira » Fri Sep 15, 2006 10:25 am

So why don't you just get a thinner ply material for the solid wall, and laminate the interior wood that you want to use for your cabin?

Structurally, you can equal the 3/4 this way.

Solid wall requires a little more planning with the wires, since you have to run through your roof spars and under-floor, but a ton of guys have done it here.
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Postby Tripmaker » Fri Sep 15, 2006 12:43 pm

Ira wrote:So why don't you just get a thinner ply material for the solid wall, and laminate the interior wood that you want to use for your cabin?

Structurally, you can equal the 3/4 this way.

Solid wall requires a little more planning with the wires, since you have to run through your roof spars and under-floor, but a ton of guys have done it here.


That's what I plan to do. See my earlier post.
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Postby Ira » Fri Sep 15, 2006 2:03 pm

Tripmaker wrote:
Ira wrote:So why don't you just get a thinner ply material for the solid wall, and laminate the interior wood that you want to use for your cabin?

Structurally, you can equal the 3/4 this way.

Solid wall requires a little more planning with the wires, since you have to run through your roof spars and under-floor, but a ton of guys have done it here.


That's what I plan to do. See my earlier post.


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