Glue Question

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Glue Question

Postby JunkMan » Sat May 28, 2005 6:55 pm

I'm making sandwich type walls, and started building my side walls using Gorilla Glue. I'm gluing the lap joints on the frame, and gluing the 1/4 plywood to the frames with it.

I ran out this afternoon, and went to pick up another bottle. I see that Elmers has a similar glue, Probond Ultimate polyurethane, but it's about 1/3 cheaper! Has anyone used it? Is it as good as Gorilla glue?
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Postby Steve Frederick » Sat May 28, 2005 7:30 pm

That's what I used on Mike's 'Diner and mine too.
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Postby Marck » Sat May 28, 2005 8:10 pm

I'm currently using both... they seem identical to me....both foam up well, both hold well.
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Postby norm perkiss » Sat May 28, 2005 8:23 pm

Junkman,
I've used both on the Tear, they seem to be the same. Time will tell.
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Postby JunkMan » Sun May 29, 2005 10:13 am

I guess I'll pick up some of the Elmers this morning since it sounds like they are pretty much the same. I can always find something else to buy for the tear with the money I save on glue. :lol:
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Postby Chris C » Sun May 29, 2005 3:22 pm

I make custom furniture for a living and am opinionated concerning glues. I believe polyurethan glues have their place, but are overrated in some areas. The popular belief is they hold well because they expand and will fill gaps..............NADA! Actually, as they span a gap wider than .005" (thickness of typing paper) they start to loose strength. The ONLY glue which maintains it's rated holding power across a gap is epoxy. So, actually, you have to assure that all surfaces touch. The polyurethane glues are actually no stronger than common white or yellow glues. Today's glue technology is so advanced that any woodworking glue is stronger than the wood fiber itself. The single greatest attribute of polyurethane glues is water resistance. But TightBond has excellent waterproof glues. I think the single greatest deterent for me is polyurethane glues practically have to wear off of your hands and clothing. That darned stuff ends up everywhere you don't want it. Personally, I'll stick with properly fitted parts and Tightbond II. Any excess or spillage is easily cleaned with a water-soaked rag.

(See, I told you I was opinionated!) :lol:
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Postby doug hodder » Sun May 29, 2005 11:35 pm

Chris........I agree with you. A foaming polyurethane glue won't make up for a poor fitting joint. Eventually it will fail. I do think that for laminating up materials, or if you can shoot a screw into the joint along with the glue it is fine. Since I finished up my last boat and had a bunch of epoxy left over, I've been using it. Acutally, for me I would have used epoxy on the tear anyway. It is more expensive, but for something that is exterior use, running down the highway at 65+, being hammered with bumps, I would go with epoxy. I used some urethane on some exterior things, Adirondack chairs, and have been watching it. It appears that if it is protected from UV, like paint. it tends to hold up better than the chairs that aren't. (only water sealed) Only got 3 years on them so far. They are getting loose however. I guess it all boils down to, make your joints fit tight and don't rely on a glue to make up for it....Just my opinion. Doug Hodder
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Postby IraRat » Sun May 29, 2005 11:47 pm

Chris C wrote: I think the single greatest deterent for me is polyurethane glues practically have to wear off of your hands and clothing.


So THAT'S what that crap is on my hands.

Seriously, going out into the backyard to work on the TD for a 5-, 6-hour stretch, I'm doing a whole bunch of different things simultaneously. But I never knew exactly WHAT that black stuff was that wouldn't come off with even the most vigorous scrubbing.

I have to use a pummel (spelling?) stone, and literally scrape the epidermis off! And even THAT doesn't work 100%!!!
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Postby doug hodder » Sun May 29, 2005 11:52 pm

Hey Ira........you gotta catch it before it cures, Acetone does the trick, lacquer thinner if it's still really wet. I got a box of latex gloves. Fun Huh??????? Doug Hodder
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Postby IraRat » Mon May 30, 2005 6:21 am

doug hodder wrote:Hey Ira........you gotta catch it before it cures, Acetone does the trick, lacquer thinner if it's still really wet. I got a box of latex gloves. Fun Huh??????? Doug Hodder


I don't know about the gloves. That could get a little uncomfortable down here!

I'l consider the stains a badge of honor.
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Postby Chris C » Mon May 30, 2005 3:52 pm

The latex gloves are a double-edged sword..................yes,. they keep the glue off your hands, but they also make the gloves stick to themselves and everything else. I used to own a plastic manufacturing company and among the many things we made were buoys for the US Coast Guard and Corps of Engineers. We filled those buoys with polyurethane foam..........yes, the very same foam you are glueing trailers together with. We went through 100's of boxes of latex gloves a month. That's hundreds of BOXES! (with 100 gloves each inside) My choice still remains..........leave the polyurethane glue alone and enjoy the pluses of Titebond II...............or if you really want a super glue, use two part epoxy.

Still just my opinionated opinion. :)
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Postby angib » Mon May 30, 2005 4:03 pm

Chris C wrote:The latex gloves are a double-edged sword.................. yes, they keep the glue off your hands, but they also make the gloves stick to themselves and everything else.

I used to buy vinyl gloves for one of the guys where I worked who was allergic to latex (incidentally, surprisingly common). They don't fit as neatly, but feel less sweaty and stand up to some solvents better than latex - but we're only talking twice as long, not forever.

The best gloves for doing sensitive work and not falling apart we found were the heavy duty version of a domestic dishwashing glove! Nowhere as cheap as latex disposable, but lasted a week or so, instead of an hour or so.

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Postby asianflava » Mon May 30, 2005 4:18 pm

I use the blue Nitrile gloves. I get them from work, they are a lot thicker than the ones you buy in the store. We go thru hundreds ob boxes of gloves at work. Everyone who enters the factory must put on a pair of gloves, and put on new ones if the get ripped.
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