Glues

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Glues

Postby PaulC » Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:57 am

I've just noticed a recommendation, in another thread, on not using polyurethane glue in your build. What is the general consensus on this? I decided to use this type of glue on Number 2 and now a doubt has been raised.
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Postby Jiminsav » Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:36 am

Paul, my observation was that the glue doesn't penetrate the wood at all, it just sticks to the surface of the joint, now, I will admit it's a hell of a bond if you try and pull the joint apart, but if you give it a sideways smack with a hammer, it snaps right off.
now, that PL adhesive in the caulking tube is good stuff..it does penetrate and it is harder then hell to pull it apart, and when it does, wood stickes to it.
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Postby Steve Frederick » Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:38 am

The thing with polyurethane glues, like Gorilla Glue, is that they require moisture to cure. The directions state that you should dampen the gluing surfaces slightly, before glue-up. I usually wipe the wood with a damp rag..no trouble so-far. I only use Poly-glue for the wall/floor build-ups. (TitebondII everywhere else) I have started to use PL2000, a polyurethane construction adhesive, for laminating. Works with foam, and I can spread it with a notched trowel. Also, no mention , that I saw, of a moisture requirement.
In your area, I would surely follow the moisture directive when using the Gorilla! :fan:
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Postby Sonetpro » Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:42 am

Paul I used it. It works well but it does have to be clamped real well. I used it to glue the frame to the wall, When I had to cut notches for the bulkhead I had to chisel it off. The wood would break before the glue would. Just my experience with it. I used alot of it.
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Postby PaulC » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:02 am

Wherever I have glued I have moistened the joint. I have also screwed the pieces together. The screws have had glue(not poly) applied to the threads to act as a threadlock. I'm hoping all this will be sufficient to hold it all together bearing in mind that it will be used for offroading purposes.
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Postby Chris C » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:08 am

Paul,

All of the polyurethane glues have the same characteristics. Both the good and the bad! If the joined surfaces are no farther apart than .002", the joint will be permanent.............however, the foam will not adequately bridge a gap greater than that. In fact, if the surfaces are farther apart than .015", the bond is almost worthless. Good Poly construction adhesives do a good job of mechanically boonding surfaces that both touch and don't meet quite right. Epoxy is the single best bond, but sometimes it is too messy. Titebond III, in my opinion, is the best all-round, waterproof option after Epoxy.
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Postby Tear Fan » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:36 am

In some of my custom work, I have used the "Gorilla" brand of polyurethane glue with much success. I used it on the handrails of the bridge below, comprised of two 1X4s laminated together and bent - as you can see. I have made approximately 25 to 30 of these bridges and have had a zero failure rate on the handrails. As Chris says, the pieces must be clamped, and I typically use 25 to 30 clamps per handrail, but the product does what it says and the excess is easily sanded off or shaped. (IMHO)

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Postby Miriam C. » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:04 am

Paul
I tried Gorilla glue on a surface that was water resistant and it didn't stick at all to one side. I could peel it off the other. Foam everywhere.

I am giving serious thought to using Silkaflex (elastomeric type) for the sides and top...
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Postby madjack » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:23 am

Paul. we used both Gorilla and Titebond III, they both have their places...we have been very happy with the gorilla glue...Gorilla glue does not require as heavy duty a clamping as Titebond to achieve the desired results but it does need some clampage and the joints need to be tight fitting...primarily we used Gorilla anywhere that we brad nailed or used spring calmps and Titebond wherever we could apply serious clampage(not spring clamps)...it has worked well for us...as with all such things, read the application instructions...YMMV
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p.s....we also used the GG at the points where we glued(and screwed) aluminum and wood together(cleats)...also the Pl construction adhesivs and the Sikaflex225 are good if there is a slight gap to span...we will probably use more of them on future builds...especially the Sikaflex225 since it can be had in white, black and grey
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Postby surveytech » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:11 pm

I used Titebond III everywhere in my trailer. It worked great.

Best part to me was using a rag wet with water to clean up the runs.
With Gorilla Glue you need solvent.
So I always have a coffee can filled with water with a rag in it ready to go.

Just one way to do it.
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Postby PaulC » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:14 pm

I'm sort of figuring that with screws set every 4", and the glue, I should'nt have a problem. Bearing in mind that all the screws are glued in as well(overbuild?)
Thanks for the responses all :applause:
If I do have a problem I guess I'll just have to build Number3 :shock:

Cheers
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Triton Workcenter

Postby Guy » Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:38 pm

Dear Paul,

How is your Triton Work Centre doing? Are they selling that up here?
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Postby oklahomajewel » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:28 pm

I have not used the Gorilla Glue by name, but instead used the PL glue alternative bought at Lowe's and it seems the stuff is holding awfully well. I used it glueing on peices of insulation too, and have had to pull off some and also trim back some support peices and seemed like it was the HARDEST stuff to pull apart.

I had looked at the directions and swore it didn't say you had to moisten the wood, but yes it does. It says that it will take longer to set up if you don't.

Now I'm on a bottle of the Elmer's poly glue, looks the same.

Hope my tear holds together.!!! just think -- what do you think they used in the 50s? 60s? carpenter's glue?

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Postby Woodbutcher » Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:04 pm

Well today I glued the side walls to the deck. The roof stringers and the inside ceiling. I used Liquid nails between the floor deck and the base of the walls with 3" screws every 6 ". Then I used Gorilla glue to glue the roof stringers to the walls. Each if these is wedged in tightly and secured with 3" screws. Then I glued the ceiling in with Liquid nails Panel adhesive. I put on a large bead then squeezed the panel in, then released it a few minutes and then clamped it in place. It seems real tight. Wish you guys would have brought this up yesterday. I have no mechanical fasteners holding up the ceiling. I will put a strip of wood over the seam between the 2 pieces in the ceiling. Then the inside walls will be squeezed up to lock in the ceiling. Hope this works!

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Postby PaulC » Wed Jun 28, 2006 1:09 am

Hi Woodbutcher, I'm figuring that your method will be OK. I just love gluing AND screwing 8)

Good point on what they had available in the early days Julie. Maybe I'm being just a little paranoid :?

Hi Guy, the workcentre is an absolute gem. It gets used for everything imaginable. I know that Larwyn has purchased one up there. He should be able to let you know where to go.

Cheers
Paul :thumbsup:
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